Trials

  • February 20, 2024

    Peloton Win Brings 'Bike+' TM Suit To A Screeching Halt

    A California federal magistrate judge has tossed a trademark suit against Peloton over its "Bike+" brand, saying in her summary judgment decision that there is "no likelihood of confusion" between the interactive fitness equipment giant's product and a mobile app developed by a professional cyclist's fitness-tech company.

  • February 20, 2024

    New Yorker Writer Pans Subpoena Over Adams' Ties To Pastor

    A writer for The New Yorker said that being forced to testify about an indicted Brooklyn pastor's ties to Mayor Eric Adams would step on journalistic privilege, arguing that Manhattan federal prosecutors could instead rely on other sources.

  • February 20, 2024

    Alito 'Concerned' Jurors Can Be Axed For Religious Beliefs

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito said Tuesday he is "concerned" about the prospect of potential jurors being dismissed because of their religious beliefs, as the justices declined to hear a case in which Christian jurors were excused over their views on homosexuality.

  • February 20, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Seeks June Trial Date In 'Rust' Shooting

    Alec Baldwin's attorney urged a New Mexico judge Tuesday to set a June trial date for the actor on involuntary manslaughter charges in the shooting death of "Rust" cinematographer Halyna Hutchins.

  • February 16, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Rethink Overturning Bid-Rigging Conviction

    The Fourth Circuit declined to reconsider a panel ruling that overturned a former Contech executive's bid-rigging conviction, despite the U.S. Department of Justice's contention that the decision flouts long-standing precedent.

  • February 16, 2024

    Boeing And Lion Air Families Spar In 7th Circ. Jury Trial Bid

    The Seventh Circuit on Friday considered whether a more than century-old law governing fatal accidents occurring over the high seas allows the two remaining victims' estates suing Boeing over the Lion Air 737 Max crash to demand a jury trial.

  • February 16, 2024

    Family Of 23-Year-Old Who Died From Ulcer Gets $30M

    A Florida state jury awarded $30 million to the family of a 23-year-old woman who died from an untreated ulcer at a Tampa hospital after finding the two doctors entrusted with her care liable for negligence.

  • February 16, 2024

    Most Courts Don't Know If Their Juries Are Fair, Report Says

    In a majority of states, it's impossible to tell whether jurors actually represent a cross-section of their community because state courts don't collect race and ethnicity data, researchers at University of California, Berkeley School of Law found in a recent report.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Ill. Senator Admits Campaign Fund Misuse After Trial

    A former Illinois state senator has admitted using campaign funds to buy trucks and recreational vehicles, pleading guilty to all counts after a three-day bench trial.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fulton DA DQ Hearing Wraps With Fight Over Privilege

    The evidentiary hearing in Georgia over whether Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis should be removed from the case against former President Donald Trump and his allies has concluded for the time being, a judge said Friday after nearly seven hours of testimony.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Asks Justices To Give Time For DC Immunity Appeal

    Donald Trump made a final plea Thursday asking the U.S. Supreme Court to stay a D.C. Circuit panel's ruling that he is not immune from federal charges of interfering in the 2020 presidential election, slamming special counsel Jack Smith's bid to get on with the former president's trial.

  • February 15, 2024

    VLSI Asks Fed. Circ. To Halt Trial On Intel License Defense

    VLSI urged the Federal Circuit on Thursday to block a California federal court from holding a trial solely on Intel's argument that it has a license to VLSI's patents after Intel was cleared of infringement, saying the court has acted "in clear excess of its jurisdiction."

  • February 15, 2024

    Restaurant Franchise Owner Hit With $30.7M Jury Verdict

    A Dallas County, Texas, jury has returned a $30.7 million verdict against major restaurant franchise company Sun Holdings Inc. and its owner in favor of an executive who claimed they refused to pay him his fair share of profits for operating nearly 150 Popeyes eateries.

  • February 15, 2024

    IP Forecast: 'No Labels' Party Feuds With Website Over Name

    In advance of debuting candidates for its promised "Unity Ticket for 2024," third-party political group No Labels will fight next week with a website's owners who say the group's name is merely a generic phrase any candidate can use. Here's a look at that case — plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • February 15, 2024

    Atty Must Be Tried Alongside Ex-Hawaii DA, Feds Say

    Prosecutors have urged a federal judge not to sever a lawyer from a criminal case against former Honolulu top prosecutor Keith Kaneshiro and others, saying she was a "primary" facilitator of a prosecution-for-donations conspiracy.

  • February 15, 2024

    NRA Accuses NY AG Of Political Bias As Trial Closes

    Lawyers for the National Rifle Association and its former CEO Wayne LaPierre accused New York Attorney General Letitia James of political bias in their final trial arguments Thursday, while a government attorney said this "witch hunt" defense is merely a distraction from the gun group's misuse of charitable assets.

  • February 15, 2024

    Calif. Jury Clears Duplo In Trial Over MGI Printer Patents

    A California federal jury has found that Duplo USA Corp. didn't infringe any claims of MGI Digital Technology SA's printer patents it was accused of infringing and that those claims were invalid, according to a verdict made public Thursday,

  • February 15, 2024

    Judge Says Jurors Can See J&J Ads In Talc Trial

    A Florida judge on Thursday said decades-old advertisements for Johnson & Johnson baby powder are relevant to potential punitive damages in a talc trial and he would not shield jurors from seeing them, but he scolded the company for not opting for a two-part trial on liability and punitive damages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-Employer Blasts Lewis Brisbois Partner's Immunity Claim

    A Houston lawyer and his firm, Berg & Androphy, are urging a Texas state court to reject an attempt by a former employee and current partner with Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP to avoid $457,190 in potential sanctions for allegedly harassing Berg & Androphy with years of legal fights over back wages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Chancery Nixes Most Of Frank Founder's $835K Fee Demand

    The indicted founder of student financial planning venture Frank may not "shoehorn" new legal fee claims into a May 2023 court order that JPMorgan Chase Bank NA pay her defense on charges that she defrauded the bank when it bought her startup for $175 million in 2021, Delaware's Court of Chancery has ruled.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ga. Jury Convicts PPP Fraudsters In $11M Case

    A Georgia federal jury found a man and woman guilty on Thursday of involvement in a sprawling Paycheck Protection Program loan fraud scheme that defrauded the government of more than $11 million.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Prosecutor Blasts DQ Bid: 'Contrary To Democracy'

    Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani Willis delivered fiery testimony Thursday during a hearing seeking to have her office removed from the election interference case of Donald Trump and his allies, forcefully denying an improper relationship with a special prosecutor tapped for the high-profile case.

  • February 15, 2024

    1st Circ. Says Atty's Absence No Reason To Toss RICO Case

    The First Circuit has said a Boston federal judge's decision to dismiss a civil racketeering lawsuit after the plaintiff's counsel missed a hearing was an unwarranted rush to the "draconian sanction," which should be reserved for more extreme misconduct.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Lessons From Rare Post-Verdict Healthcare Fraud Acquittal

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    A Maryland federal court recently overturned a jury verdict that found a doctor guilty of healthcare fraud related to billing levels for COVID-19 tests, providing defense attorneys with potential strategies for obtaining acquittals in similar prosecutions, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

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    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • A Closer Look At Novel Jury Instruction In Forex Rigging Case

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    After the recent commodities fraud conviction of a U.K.-based hedge fund executive in U.S. v. Phillips, post-trial briefing has focused on whether the New York federal court’s jury instruction incorrectly defined the requisite level of intent, which should inform defense counsel in future open market manipulation cases, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • What To Know About WDTX Standing Order For Patent Cases

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    Patent litigators should review and ensure compliance with the standing order recently issued by U.S. District Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas — a popular patent litigation venue — which encompasses new deadlines, seeks to streamline discovery disputes, and further reflects the court's existing practices, says Archibald Cruz at Patterson + Sheridan.

  • 10 Lessons From A Deep Dive Into IP Damages

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    Decisions on challenging an intellectual property expert's opinion can benefit from the in-depth study of court rulings on admissibility grounds, where the findings include the fact that patent cases see the most challenges of any IP area, say Deepa Sundararaman and Cleve Tyler at Berkeley Research.

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