Telecommunications

  • February 20, 2024

    Epic Calls Apple's $73M Fees Bid Overreach

    Epic Games blasted Apple on Friday for seeking $73.4 million in legal fees following the pair's California federal court antitrust battle over App Store payment fees, arguing that antitrust claims like Epic's are immune from legal fees and that Apple cannot wrap its demands in successful contract breach counterclaims.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Give Feds Time In Texas, Fla. Social Media Law Fights

    The U.S. Supreme Court has set aside time for the federal government to weigh in on looming oral arguments in cases to determine the constitutionality of controversial Texas and Florida laws that restrict social media companies' ability to curb users' speech.

  • February 20, 2024

    EU Approves Orange's €18.6B Spanish Telecoms JV

    Europe's competition enforcer on Tuesday approved a deal for Orange SA and MasMovil Ibercom SA to combine their operations in Spain through a €18.6 billion ($20.3 billion) joint venture after the companies agreed to sell spectrum to a growing mobile operator in the country.

  • February 20, 2024

    FCC Panel To Focus On AI's Consumer Impact

    The Federal Communications Commission set a consumer advisory panel back into motion Tuesday, with the impact of artificial intelligence on the telecom industry as a top priority.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Apple Patent Challenge In $576M Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Tuesday to consider if Apple should have been barred from joining a successful challenge to network security patents in a $576.5 million case, turning down cybersecurity company VirnetX Inc.'s argument that Apple's petition was filed too late.

  • February 16, 2024

    FCC Needs Enforcement Ombudsman, Ex-Agency Atty Says

    The Federal Communications Commission should consider a wide range of enforcement-related reforms, including creating an ombudsman's office to help companies navigate disputes that crop up during FCC investigations, a former agency general counsel has argued in a new industry-backed paper.

  • February 16, 2024

    Samsung Ordered To Arbitrate Hundreds Of BIPA Claims

    An Illinois federal judge has ordered Samsung Electronics to arbitrate 806 customers' biometric-privacy claims and to pay the American Arbitration Association for fees it owes in the slew of disputes, ruling that the company can't refuse to arbitrate under its own binding agreements.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Comcast Patent Case, And Warns Its Atty

    The Federal Circuit on Friday revived a patent suit against Comcast over voice recognition technology, finding that a lower court misinterpreted the patents, and reprimanded a Comcast attorney from Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP for exceeding word counts in a brief in a related case.

  • February 16, 2024

    FCC Offers Incentives So Small Carriers Can Use Spectrum

    The Federal Communications Commission's new program to encourage spectrum licensees to divvy up their unused airwaves for sublease to smaller and more rural carriers is now up and running and accepting applications.

  • February 16, 2024

    States Defend Authority To Bring Texas Google Ad Tech Case

    State enforcers have told a Texas federal court they have standing to sue Google for allegedly violating federal antitrust law with its control over key digital advertising technology, arguing that states play an important role in enforcing the statutes and that Google's dismissal bid is unfounded.

  • February 16, 2024

    Malware Schemer 'Tank' Pleads Guilty To Stealing Millions

    Accused hacker group leader Vyacheslav Igorevich Penchukov, known online as "Tank," pled guilty in Nebraska federal court to charges stemming from two malware schemes Thursday.

  • February 16, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a legal battle erupt between JPMorgan and the founder of a Greek payments company following a dispute over the valuation of their jointly owned fintech business, the children of late Russian oligarch Vladimir Scherbakov face a claim by Fieldfisher LLP, the Director of Education and Training at the Solicitors Regulation Authority tackle a claim by two solicitors, and train operator First MTR South Western Trains file a claim against a security company. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • February 15, 2024

    Home Depot, Google Sued Over AI Customer Call Monitoring

    Home Depot and Google were hit with a proposed class action in California federal court Wednesday, accusing them of deploying artificial intelligence technology to surreptitiously "eavesdrop" on calls between customers and Home Depot's representatives without permission, in violation of Golden State privacy laws.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC Wants Licensing Revamp To Help Hatch Space Industries

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday proposed ways to streamline federal licensing needed to support an array of services in space, including manufacturing and parts assembly.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC Makes It Easier To Revoke Robocall Consent

    The Federal Communications Commission has ushered in new rules that are supposed to make it easier than ever for consumers to revoke previously given consent to receive telemarketing calls and text messages.

  • February 15, 2024

    7th Circ. Questions $4M Samsung Arbitration Fee Order

    The Seventh Circuit seemed skeptical Thursday that more than 35,000 Samsung consumers had enough evidence to prove the telecommunications giant should pay $4 million in individual biometric privacy arbitration fees, as one judge also questioned whether the appeal is properly before the court. 

  • February 15, 2024

    Lenovo, Motorola Lose Injunction Bid In IP License Fight

    A North Carolina federal judge has rejected a bid from Lenovo and Motorola Mobility to block Ericsson from being able to enforce injunctions it got in other countries barring sales of Lenovo products in those countries.

  • February 15, 2024

    Biz Groups Urge Feds To Back WTO's Block On Digital Duties

    Major U.S. trade and business groups, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Foreign Trade Council, urged U.S. officials to back the World Trade Organization's suspension of tariffs on electronic transmissions ahead of a renewal vote later this month.

  • February 15, 2024

    State Dept. Offers $5M For Info On 'BlackCat' Ransomware Group

    The State Department is offering millions for information on the "BlackCat" ransomware, claiming that the AlphV cybercrime group has compromised over 1,000 entities globally.

  • February 15, 2024

    FCC To Expand Emergency Alerts In Multiple Languages

    The Federal Communications Commission proposed new rules Thursday that would make it easier to broadcast emergency alerts in multiple languages on TV and radio.

  • February 15, 2024

    GSA Probed For Buying Banned Chinese Conferencing Cams

    The House Oversight Committee's Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Information Technology, and Government Innovation is probing the General Services Administration's purchase of videoconference cameras made in China following a recent report by the GSA's internal watchdog the subcommittee said raised alarming questions.

  • February 14, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Google's Use Of User Data Quotas Draws 9th Circ. Analogies

    A Ninth Circuit panel Wednesday struggled to find an apt analogy for a property claim made by Android users alleging in a proposed class action that Google illegally uses their purchased data allotments to transmit information back to the company, comparing the intangible data to electricity or an annuity, among other hypotheticals.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

  • February 14, 2024

    FCC Nixes NM Schools' Bid For Cancelled Radio Stations

    The Albuquerque Board of Education has no relationship with the person who surrendered two radio station licenses and, therefore, cannot petition the Federal Communications Commission to undo that decision and hand the licenses over to them as "trustees," the agency has declared.

  • February 14, 2024

    Honda, Ford Push For Review Of New Wireless IP

    Honda is urging U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal to vacate the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's decision not to review a Neo Wireless patent it had challenged, the same day Ford did the same.

Expert Analysis

  • What's On The Horizon In Attorney General Enforcement

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    A look at recent attorney general actions, especially in the areas of antitrust and artificial intelligence, can help inform businesses on what they should expect in terms of enforcement trends as 10 attorney general races play out in 2024, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • How High Court SEC Case Could Affect The ITC

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Jarkesy will likely spare the U.S. International Trade Commission from major operative changes, the ITC’s ability to issue penalties for violations of its orders may change, say Gwendolyn Tawresey and Ryan Deck at Troutman Pepper.

  • Navigating The FCC's Rules On AI-Generated Robocall Voices

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    The Federal Communications Commission's declaratory ruling issued last week extends the agency's regulatory reach under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act to calls that use artificial intelligence technology to generate voices, laying out a compliance roadmap, but not making AI-cloned voices in robocalls illegal per se, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Vodafone Decision Highlights Wide Scope Of UK's FDI Rules

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    The U.K. government’s recently imposed conditions required for its approval of Vodafone and Etisalat’s strategic relationship agreement under its National Security and Investment Act jurisdiction, illustrating the significance of the act as an important factor for transactions with a U.K. link, says Matthew Hall at McGuireWoods.

  • Is Compulsory Copyright Licensing Needed For AI Tech?

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    The U.S. Copyright Office's inquiry into whether Congress should establish a compulsory licensing regime for artificial intelligence technologies that are trained on copyrighted works has received relatively little attention — but commenters recently opposed the regime under three key themes, say Michael Kientzle and Ryan White at Arnold & Porter.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Verizon Benefits Ruling Clears Up Lien Burden Of Proof

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    A Rhode Island federal court recently ruled that a Verizon benefits plan could not recoup a former employee’s settlement funds from the attorney who represented her in a personal injury case, importantly clarifying two Employee Retirement Income Security Act burden of proof issues that were previously unsettled, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Assessing Merger Guideline Feedback With Machine Learning

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    Large language modeling appears to show that public sentiment matches agency intent around the new merger control guidelines from the Federal Trade Commission and U.S. Justice Department, says Andrew Sfekas at Cornerstone Research.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Considering A Practical FRAND Rate Assessment Procedure

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    As the debate over a fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory rate continues inside and outside courtrooms, a practical method may assess whether the proposed FRAND rate deviates significantly from what is reasonable, and ensure an optimal mix of assets for managers of standard-essential patent portfolios, says consultant Gordon Huang.

  • A Close Look At The FCC's Revised SIM Card Fraud Rules

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    Carolyn Mahoney and John Seiver at Davis Wright break down recently proposed revisions to the Federal Communications Commission's customer proprietary network information and local number portability rules for wireless providers, discuss the revisions' implications on artificial intelligence regulation, and provide tips to prevent SIM swap and port-out fraud.

  • What Retailers Should Note In Calif. Web Tracking Suits

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    As retailers face a deluge of class actions alleging the use of conventional web analytic tools violate wiretapping and eavesdropping provisions of the California Invasion of Privacy Act, uncovering the path toward a narrow interpretation of the law will largely depend on how these cases proceed, say Matthew Pearson and Kareem Salem at BakerHostetler.

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