Pennsylvania

  • February 20, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Hires Ex-Eckert Seamans Public Finance Atty

    Philadelphia-based Cozen O'Connor said Tuesday it has hired a former finance attorney from Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC for its public and project finance practice.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pennsylvania Ballots Need Correct Dates, 3rd Circ. Told

    Republican organizations seeking to enforce a Pennsylvania requirement that mail-in ballots have a date and signature on their outer envelope urged the Third Circuit on Tuesday to rule that a district court judge who found more than 10,000 undated or misdated ballots to be valid too broadly applied the materiality provision of the Civil Rights Act.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pa. Contractor Says Ohio Cosmetic Centers Skipped $2M Bill

    A construction contractor took the owner of several medical spa and cosmetic surgery practices to Pennsylvania state court on Friday after the healthcare firm allegedly halted projects in two Ohio suburbs and then failed to pay $2 million that the builder was owed for its work on them.

  • February 17, 2024

    Suspended Pa. Judge Charged With Shooting Ex-Boyfriend

    A Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, magisterial judge already suspended for alleged ethics violations has been charged with attempted murder and aggravated assault for allegedly shooting her ex-boyfriend in the head while he slept, police and prosecutors said.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Comcast Patent Case, And Warns Its Atty

    The Federal Circuit on Friday revived a patent suit against Comcast over voice recognition technology, finding that a lower court misinterpreted the patents, and reprimanded a Comcast attorney from Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP for exceeding word counts in a brief in a related case.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    PNC Bank Defeats Customer's Suit Over Fraudulent Transfer

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday tossed the two remaining claims in a suit alleging PNC Bank NA misled a California-based customer about stopping a money transfer to a scammer, saying the bank did not breach the account-holder agreement when it tried to recover the customer's funds.

  • February 16, 2024

    Uber Tells Court To Disregard Pa. AG's Brief In Wage Suit

    Uber urged a Pennsylvania federal court on Friday to disregard the state attorney general's amicus brief filed in a wage case that will decide whether UberBlack limo drivers are employees or independent contractors, saying the attorney general's involvement is superfluous.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Target, Hoverboard Biz Settle Pa. Fire Deaths For $38.5M

    The parents of two deceased girls, Target and a hoverboard maker entered into a $38.5 million settlement Friday resolving a lawsuit in Pennsylvania federal court over a self-balancing scooter that allegedly shorted out while charging and caused a house fire that claimed the sisters' lives.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Split Court Won't Stop Philly Ban On 3D-Printed Gun Parts

    Philadelphia can keep an ordinance banning the 3D printing and assembly of gun parts into so-called "ghost guns," after a split Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania said Friday that the state law preempting local firearm regulations didn't extend to incomplete firearm components.

  • February 16, 2024

    Chamberlain Hrdlicka Adds Corporate Attorney In Philly

    A seasoned transactions attorney has returned to private practice after more than 10 years as in-house counsel and joined Chamberlain Hrdlicka White Williams & Aughtry's Philadelphia office.

  • February 16, 2024

    Pa. Man Who Beheaded Father Charged With Targeting Judge

    A Philadelphia-area man who allegedly shot his father and displayed his decapitated head on YouTube faces additional terrorism charges after investigators found he had made videos calling for violence against a federal judge and other government officials.

  • February 16, 2024

    Former Worker Says Supercuts Owner Cut OT Rate Too Short

    A former worker is accusing the owner of about 400 Supercuts, Cost Cutters and Holiday Hair salons in seven states of shortchanging its hourly employees on their compensation by not accounting for commissions and other non-discretionary bonuses in their overtime rate calculations.

  • February 15, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says Rutgers Can Mandate COVID-19 Vaccines

    The Third Circuit on Thursday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit by Rutgers University students who challenged the school's COVID-19 vaccine policy, with the majority finding that, under the U.S. Supreme Court precedent in Jacobson v. Massachusetts, there is no fundamental right to refuse vaccinations.

  • February 15, 2024

    Court Overrides Objectors, OKs $80M Wells Fargo Repo Deal

    A Pennsylvania federal court gave its final approval Thursday to an $80 million settlement of wrongful repossession claims against Wells Fargo, despite objections from a Pittsburgh couple who wanted to continue their own proposed class action against the company.

  • February 15, 2024

    AGs Press FDA On Safeguards Against Metal In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from states across the country urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration once again on Thursday to establish requirements that baby food producers test for lead and other metals in products headed for store shelves, citing a recent wave of childhood lead poisoning connected to recalled applesauce pouches.  

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-NJ Law Officers Allowed Concealed Carry, 3rd Circ. Rules

    The Third Circuit, in a precedential ruling, held that a federal statute allows former state and federal law enforcement officers in New Jersey to carry concealed firearms, rejecting the Garden State's argument that the law does not provide that right.

  • February 15, 2024

    Med Monitoring Claims In Philips MDL Sent Back For Review

    The judge overseeing multidistrict litigation over Koninklijke Philips NV's recalled breathing machines has declined a special master's recommendation to trim claims seeking medical monitoring for some users, instead sending the case back for a deeper look at which states would allow such claims or whether they required proof of physical injury.

  • February 15, 2024

    'Jock Tax' Is Constitutional, Pittsburgh Tells Pa. Justices

    The Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court erred by ruling Pittsburgh's fee on nonresident professional athletes violates the state constitution's uniformity clause, the city told the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

  • February 15, 2024

    Vaughan Baio Adds 3 Partners And 2 Offices In NY, NJ

    Philadelphia-based midsized firm Vaughan Baio & Partners expanded its footprint and resources this month with the addition of three partners and the opening of two offices in New York and New Jersey.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 14, 2024

    Security Firms Want Suit Over Toll Bros. Deal Trimmed Again

    Two home security companies asked a Connecticut state court to further trim a breach-of-contract suit brought by the security arm of Pennsylvania-based building firm Toll Brothers over a $12 million deal to buy customer accounts.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

    Author Photo

    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

    Author Photo

    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

    Author Photo

    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

    Author Photo

    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

    Author Photo

    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

    Author Photo

    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

    Author Photo

    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • The Questions Around Prometheum's SEC-Compliant Strategy

    Author Photo

    While the rest of the crypto industry has been engaged in a long-running battle to escape the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's jurisdiction, a once-obscure startup called Prometheum has instead embraced the SEC's view to become the first crypto special-purpose broker-dealer, but it's unclear whether it can turn its favored status into a workable business, says Keith Blackman at Bracewell.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

    Author Photo

    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!