Michigan

  • March 14, 2024

    Mich. AG Taps Enviro, Regulatory Chiefs As Deputy AGs

    The Michigan Attorney General's Office on Wednesday announced the promotions of two division heads to deputies and the creation of new criminal divisions to focus on victims' services and conviction integrity.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ford Slammed For Bid To 'Sidestep' Faulty Axle-Bolt Suit

    Two Washington SUV owners suing Ford for allegedly slacking on safety in newer Explorer models have accused the vehicle maker of trying to "sidestep liability" in their proposed class action by pointing to two recalls that didn't address the design flaw at issue.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Whirlpool Can't Toss Defect Suit Over Ice Buildup In Fridges

    A California federal judge has declined to throw out a putative class action claiming Whirlpool hid a defect in its refrigerators that led to cooling failures due to frost buildup, finding the suit sufficiently alleged Whirlpool knew of the problem since it issued technical service pointers noting customers could possibly experience buildup.

  • March 13, 2024

    6th Circ. Kills Orders On Calculating Delivery Driver Costs

    A Sixth Circuit panel has swept away rulings from courts in two separate states — one that sided with pizza delivery drivers and another that sided with the restaurants — over how drivers should be reimbursed for using their cars to make deliveries, saying they both got it wrong.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mich. Justice Torn Over 'Unfairness' Of Law In Treadmill Suit

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice on Wednesday seemed sympathetic to the plight of a woman who was injured when she fell off a treadmill because federal court proceedings affected her ability to timely bring state claims but said he didn't think the state's top court could tackle the likely legislative issue.

  • March 13, 2024

    Versata Wants Axed $105M Ford Verdict Revived Or Expanded

    Versata Software has urged the Federal Circuit to undo a Michigan federal judge's decision erasing a nearly $105 million trade secrets and breach of contract verdict it won against Ford, and argued that it was wrongly barred from presenting damages theories seeking up to $1.3 billion.

  • March 13, 2024

    Atty Who Skipped Vote-Tampering Hearing Can't Ditch Warrant

    A Michigan judge on Wednesday urged counsel for a lawyer evading a bench warrant to direct his client to turn herself in, rejecting claims previous counsel didn't adequately inform her of a hearing she skipped in a case where she's alleged to have tampered with voting machines after the 2020 election.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mich. Justices Open To Counties' Foreclosure Liability Fears

    Two members of the Michigan Supreme Court seemed sympathetic to Michigan counties urging the court to limit their liability for holding onto surplus tax foreclosure proceeds, highlighting during oral arguments that counties were following state law in a practice that was later deemed unconstitutional.

  • March 13, 2024

    6th Circ. Told Woman Helped Life Partner Avoid $3M In Taxes

    The federal government justifiably sold off the property of a woman who paid for it with money from her dead long-term life partner, the U.S. government told the Sixth Circuit on Wednesday, saying the purchase helped her partner skirt more than $3 million in tax liabilities.

  • March 13, 2024

    Flint Found In Contempt Over Lead Pipe Replacement Delays

    A Michigan federal judge has found the city of Flint in contempt for dragging its heels on court orders to replace the city's lead pipes after a 2017 settlement, finding that its belated, partial compliance was not enough to avoid the sanction.

  • March 12, 2024

    'Ghost Gun' Co. Sued In Mich. For Selling To Teen Shooter

    A Michigan resident who was shot by his friend with a handgun made using a do-it-yourself kit has sued a leading supplier of so-called ghost gun kits in state court, alleging the company was negligent by allowing a 17-year-old to buy a gun kit without making sure he was legally able to buy a firearm.

  • March 12, 2024

    Detroit Retirees Appeal Pension Gap Funding Pause

    Detroit's retired police and firefighters are appealing a ruling that allowed the city to continue pausing its pension gap funding payments, asking a Michigan federal court to reverse a bankruptcy judge's decision that extended a decade-long funding reprieve to 30 years.

  • March 12, 2024

    Mich. Firms Mishandled $38M Trusts, Suit Says

    A pair of Michigan law firms didn't properly advise the trustee of a construction mogul's trusts worth more than $38 million, leading the trusts to pay excessive attorney fees, lose most of their value and miss out on tax breaks, a special fiduciary tasked with investigating the trusts' handling has alleged.

  • March 12, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Revive Mich. Mall's Faulty Parking Lot Suit

    A general contractor is not liable for a Michigan parking lot that began to fail "mere months" after construction, the Sixth Circuit said, finding the company did not violate its contract with outlet mall chain Tanger.

  • March 12, 2024

    Pot Co. Says Commerce Clause Meant To Stop 'Trade Wars'

    Cannabis company Peridot Tree WA Inc. is urging a Washington federal judge to reject a bid to dismiss its suit alleging the state's cannabis social equity licensing scheme violates the Constitution's dormant commerce clause, saying the court should find that it applies to cannabis businesses.

  • March 12, 2024

    Detroit Tigers Say Age Bias Suit Should Be Thrown Out

    The Detroit Tigers urged a Michigan federal court to throw out a suit from two former scouts who said they were fired as part of a systemic push to get rid of older employees, saying both men are included in a similar proposed class action in Colorado.

  • March 11, 2024

    Contractor Wants Mich. Judge To Rethink Agreement Order

    A demolition company has urged a Michigan federal judge to reconsider his finding that the number of labor contracts between its parent association and a union fund was ambiguous and needed more thought by an arbitrator, saying evidence on the record shows that the contractor was bound by just one agreement.

  • March 11, 2024

    Injured Bus Rider Gave Up Right To Sue, Mich. Justices Told

    A Detroit public transit authority told the Michigan Supreme Court to affirm that an injured passenger can't pursue the authority for personal injury protection benefits under the state's no-fault law after assigning her right to the benefits to her medical providers.

  • March 11, 2024

    Most Claims Trimmed In Ford Faulty Transmission Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge has thrown out the bulk of a suit alleging Ford Motor Co. knowingly sold vehicles with a faulty transmission system, while allowing breach of implied warranty, fraudulent concealment and state law claims to proceed.

  • March 11, 2024

    New Detroit Voting Map Protects Incumbents, Voters Say

    Black voters are asking a Michigan federal court to reject a proposed replacement map for Detroit's voting districts drafted after the current map was ruled unconstitutional, slamming the proposal as an "incumbent protection plan" pushed by a political operative.

  • March 11, 2024

    12 Attys Depart Plunkett Cooney For Own Firm

    A dozen Plunkett Cooney PC attorneys based in Michigan have broken away to create their own firm focused on auto insurance liability defense.

  • March 11, 2024

    Mich. Justices Tell Panel To Revisit 'Robotic' Tax Ruling

    A Michigan appellate panel must reconsider its decision to uphold the denial of a man's principal-residence tax exemption under the Michigan Supreme Court's order to gather more information about the evidence the tax tribunal considered, revisiting a decision one appellate judge labeled "robotic acceptance" of the government's evidence.

  • March 08, 2024

    Mich. Court Can't Shush Library Whistleblower, Panel Says

    A Michigan appeals court has revived a former library director's whistleblower suit alleging she was fired for questioning whether the library could use public funds to pay for a board member's godson to open a restaurant on the premises, saying she reported ongoing conduct which is considered protected activity.

  • March 08, 2024

    Debt-Stricken Homeowners Fight Back After High Court Ruling

    Ten months after a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision finding a Minnesota county wrongly held onto excess proceeds it reaped after seizing a woman’s condominium and selling it to settle a tax debt, states are scrambling to reexamine their laws as financially distressed homeowners file new suits challenging the practice.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

    Author Photo

    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

    Author Photo

    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

    Author Photo

    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

    Author Photo

    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • AGs' Distaste For Food Bill May Signal Other State Issues

    Author Photo

    States' recent opposition to a proposed federal law that would block them from regulating out-of-state agricultural production could affect issues beyond this narrow debate, such as the balance of state and federal regulatory power, reproductive rights post-Dobbs, and energy production and water use, say Christopher Allen and Stephen Cobb at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

    Author Photo

    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • Autonomous Vehicles Must Navigate Patchwork Of State Regs

    Author Photo

    With only modest action by the federal government on the autonomous vehicle regulatory front in 2023, states and localities remain the predominant source of new regulations affecting AVs — but the result is a mix of rules that both help and hinder AV development and adoption, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

    Author Photo

    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • Federal Policies Keeping Autonomous Vehicles In Slow Lane

    Author Photo

    In the first installment of this two-part article, attorneys at Faegre Drinker examine recent federal regulations and programs related to autonomous vehicles — and how the federal government's failure to implement a more comprehensive AV regulatory scheme may be slowing the progress of the industry.

  • Calif. Law Tests Noncompete Prohibitions' Potential Reach

    Author Photo

    California’s newly enacted law, which voids employee restrictive covenants, whether signed in or out of the state, has the potential to upend typical agreement negotiations, and highlights ongoing questions concerning how California's worker protections fare in other jurisdictions, says Sarah Tishler at Beck Reed.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

    Author Photo

    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

    Author Photo

    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

    Author Photo

    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

    Author Photo

    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Michigan archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!