Michigan

  • March 26, 2024

    Law Firm Can't Ditch Class Cert. In Interest Rate Challenge

    A Michigan federal judge on Tuesday declined to decertify a class of debtors alleging a law firm charged unlawfully high post-judgment interest rates, saying the defendants were confused about what was needed to show standing.

  • March 26, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Let Propane Retailer Nix EEOC's Subpoena

    The Sixth Circuit said Tuesday that Ferrellgas LP must provide the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission with information it requested as part of an investigation into a sex and race discrimination charge, backing a lower court's conclusion that the request wasn't too expansive.

  • March 26, 2024

    Marriott Guests Call For Sanctions In Discrimination Suit

    Marriott Detroit guests claim they are being "improperly" denied discovery in their discrimination and harassment lawsuit against the hotel chain and urged a federal court on Sunday to issue sanctions as a result.

  • March 26, 2024

    Opioid Public Nuisance Claims 'Unique,' Ohio High Court Told

    Counsel for two Ohio counties that won a $650 million verdict against Walmart, CVS and Walgreens told the Ohio Supreme Court on Tuesday that opioids are a "unique" problem during oral arguments about whether the counties' public nuisance claims are blocked by the state's product liability law.

  • March 26, 2024

    Auto Parts Co. Must Continue Shipping To FCA, Judge Rules

    A Michigan judge has ordered a Fiat Chrysler supplier to continue delivering parts while a pricing dispute plays out in court, finding that the automaker showed its reputation would suffer if it was forced to idle plants because of a part shortage.

  • March 26, 2024

    GM Supplier Deal Missing 'Crucial' Info, Stymying Dismissal Bid

    A Michigan federal judge on Monday said it was too soon to consider tossing a South Korean producer's suit alleging a supplier failed to pay for electric-vehicle engineering services to make parts for General Motors, stating too much information is missing about the companies' agreement.

  • March 25, 2024

    Atty Can Drop Alleged Schemer Who Didn't Pay For 2 Years

    A man accused of being the mastermind behind a $2 million cannabis crowdfunding scheme must find a new lawyer after stiffing his previous counsel for nearly two years, a Michigan federal judge said Monday.

  • March 25, 2024

    Mich. Justices Asked To Review Duration Of Income Tax Cut

    A coalition of Michigan lawmakers, business groups and residents asked the state Supreme Court on Monday to review an appeals court's decision that said a cut to Michigan's income tax rate in 2023 was in effect for only one year.

  • March 25, 2024

    Mich. Defense Bar Wants To Block Lost-Earnings 'Windfall'

    An organization representing Michigan civil defense attorneys has pushed the state's Supreme Court to hold that a deceased person's future earning capacity cannot be recovered in a wrongful death lawsuit, saying the plaintiffs bar is using a recent decision to double-dip on damages.

  • March 25, 2024

    Vidal Vacates Denials Of Challenges To Neo Wireless IP

    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Director Kathi Vidal has thrown out Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions not to review whether Neo Wireless patents are invalid in challenges brought by Honda and others.

  • March 25, 2024

    'Mini' Arguments Loom Large On Mich. High Court's Docket

    A court rule unique to Michigan allows state Supreme Court justices to hear oral arguments without formally granting review in a case. The court has increasingly used the mechanism over the last decade, but it has divided the appellate bar. 

  • March 25, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear MAGA Hat Teen's Media Defamation Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a Sixth Circuit decision dismissing a suit against several media companies from a man who says they defamed him with their coverage of his encounter with a Native American activist while he was a teenager wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat.

  • March 22, 2024

    OCC Fines Sterling Bank's Ex-COO $150K For Lax Oversight

    The former president of Michigan-based Sterling Bancorp Inc. has been ordered to pay $150,000 by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency for allegedly failing to properly oversee the bank's Advantage Loan Program, which presented "high risks for fraud, money laundering, and lending misconduct."

  • March 22, 2024

    Missed Deadline May Doom Union Worker's Benefits Fight

    A Michigan federal judge on Friday warned a union worker alleging the United Auto Workers mismanaged her claim for benefits that she could have her lawsuit dismissed if she doesn't respond to the union's request to toss the accusations.

  • March 22, 2024

    Trims Recommended In Zelle Fraud Victims' Case Against BofA

    A North Carolina federal magistrate judge has recommended trimming claims in a proposed class action that alleges Bank of America NA didn't compensate for or adequately investigate scammers' unauthorized Zelle transactions despite assurances to victims who lost thousands of dollars.

  • March 22, 2024

    Detroit Hospital, Deaf Patient Can't Avoid Trial In Disability Suit

    Detroit's Henry Ford Health System may face a jury trial in a deaf patient's lawsuit claiming she was denied an American Sign Language interpreter, with a Michigan federal judge refusing to grant summary judgment to either the hospital or the patient.

  • March 22, 2024

    Phone Cos., Counties Profit From Jail Visit Bans, Families Say

    Two prison telecommunications service providers have been hit with lawsuits in Michigan state court claiming they worked with jail operators to restrict in-person visits in order to boost their profits from lockup video and phone calls.

  • March 22, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Fired Doctor Got Enough Due Process

    The Sixth Circuit backed two Ohio healthcare companies and Wright State University's early wins against a former resident doctor's claims that she was improperly fired for unprofessional conduct, stating that all the parties involved engaged in "more than enough due process" before terminating her.

  • March 22, 2024

    'Common Sense' Mich. Ruling Says Photos Not Eavesdropping

    Michigan appellate judges said it's common sense that taking a photograph isn't the same as overhearing a conversation, agreeing with a lower court that a union leader's eavesdropping claim against a rival should be tossed because an image of him posted online doesn't convey a private discussion.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Probes Outside Firm's Outreach To Class Members

    A Sixth Circuit judge suggested Thursday that there may be free-speech issues with an order barring outside attorneys from sending solicitation letters to potential class members poised to benefit from a pending settlement over Michigan counties' tax foreclosure practices.  

  • March 21, 2024

    Ford Says $350K TM Jury Award Can't Be Boosted To $15M

    Ford Motor Co. on Wednesday urged a Michigan federal court to deny a tech company's request to boost an unfair competition award against Ford from less than half a million to $15 million because the tech company didn't challenge Ford's sales and profit data at trial. 

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Skeptical Of Enbridge's Late Pipeline Suit Transfer

    A Sixth Circuit panel questioned how Enbridge Energy LP could move a lawsuit seeking to shut down one of its pipelines to federal court more than two years after it was filed, pressing the company Thursday to justify missing the 30-day cutoff for removals.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Revives McKee's Network Plan Fight With Thrifty Med

    The Sixth Circuit reinstated on Thursday McKee Foods Corp.'s suit against Thrifty MedPlus Pharmacy alleging Tennessee law requiring pharmacy benefit managers to let "any willing pharmacies" participate in a network was preempted by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, finding that amendments made to the statute didn't render McKee's claims moot.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Doubtful Of Hospital Workers' Vax Exemption Claim

    A Sixth Circuit panel appeared skeptical Thursday of an argument from a class of former employees of Ohio Children's Hospital that their First Amendment rights to freedom of religion were violated under the hospital's COVID-19 employee vaccination policy.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Zeroes In On CBA In Vax Bias Preemption Battle

    A Sixth Circuit panel pressed on Thursday a cargo airline and pilots who say they were unlawfully fired for refusing COVID-19 vaccinations about the pilots' union contract, with one judge asking whether the open questions about their collective bargaining agreement meant the discrimination case was preempted.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look At 2023's Major NLRB Developments Thus Far

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    Over the last six months, the National Labor Relations Board has broadened its interpretation and enforcement of the National Labor Relations Act, including increasing penalties and efforts to prohibit restrictive covenants and confidentiality agreements, say Eve Klein and Elizabeth Mincer at Duane Morris.

  • High Court Cert Denial Puts New Spotlight On Plea Bargains

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to hear Davis v. U.S. — provoking two justices’ dissent — highlights a lesser-known circuit split on whether an attorney's failure to pursue a plea agreement constitutes ineffective assistance of counsel, and will likely spur several key changes in criminal law practice, says Spencer Gottlieb at Perkins Coie.

  • Now Is The Time For State And Local Sales Tax Simplification

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    In the five years since the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair, state and local governments increasingly rely on sales tax, but simple changes are needed to make compliance more manageable for taxpayers, wherever located, without unduly burdening interstate commerce, says Charles Maniace at Sovos.

  • 5 Management Tips To Keep Law Firm Merger Talks Moving

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    Many law firm mergers that make solid business sense still fall apart due to the costs and frustrations of inefficient negotiations, but firm managers can increase the chance of success by effectively planning and executing merger discussions, say Lisa Smith and Kristin Stark at Fairfax Associates.

  • 3 Abortion Enforcement Takeaways 1 Year After Dobbs

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    A year after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to abortion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, confusion continues to abound amid the quagmire of state-level enforcement risks, federal efforts to protect reproductive health care, and fights over geolocation data, say Elena Quattrone and Sarah Hall at Epstein Becker.

  • How States And Cities Are Responding To Biden EJ Efforts

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    Recent developments in Chicago and Louisiana show different ways local and state regulators have reacted to the Biden administration's "whole-of-government" environmental justice efforts, and may test whether the administration's approach comports with legal precedents, says J. Michael Showalter at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Rethinking In-Office Attendance For Associate Retention

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    The hybrid office attendance model doesn't work for all employees, but it does for many — and balancing these two groups is important for associate retention and maintaining a BigLaw firm culture that supports all attorneys, says Summer Eberhard at Major Lindsey.

  • Attendance Policies, ADA May Be In EEOC's Crosshairs

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    While a recent matter before the Eleventh Circuit primarily involved the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s subpoena power, the case's factual details suggest that the agency wants to determine whether certain attendance policies violate the Americans with Disabilities Act, potentially on a nationwide scale, say Anne Yuengert and William Manuel at Bradley Arant.

  • Opinion

    ALI, Bar Groups Need More Defense Engagement For Balance

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    The American Law Institute and state bar committees have a special role in the development of the law — but if they do not do a better job of including attorneys from the defense bar, they will come to be viewed as special interest advocacy groups, says Mark Behrens at Shook Hardy.

  • Murdaugh Trials Offer Law Firms Fraud Prevention Reminders

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    As the fraud case against Alex Murdaugh continues to play out, the evidence and narrative presented at his murder trial earlier this year may provide lessons for law firms on implementing robust internal controls that can detect and prevent similar kinds of fraud, say Travis Casner and Helga Zauner at Weaver and Tidwell.

  • Challenging Standing In Antitrust Class Actions: Rule 23

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    A recent Sixth Circuit decision in Fox v. Saginaw County that rejected the common attempt to use Rule 23 to sidestep Article III's standing limitations shows antitrust defendants' success in challenging standing will rest on happenstance without more clarity from the Supreme Court — which no litigant should be comfortable with, say Michael Hamburger and Holly Tao at White & Case.

  • Firm Tips For Helping New Lawyers Succeed Post-Pandemic

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    Ten steps can help firms significantly enhance the experience of attorneys who started their careers in the coronavirus pandemic era, including facilitating opportunities for cross-firm connection, which can ultimately help build momentum for business development, says Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners.

  • Prepping Your Business Ahead Of Affirmative Action Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming ruling on whether race should play a role in college admissions could potentially end affirmative action, and companies will need a considered approach to these circumstances that protects their brand power and future profits, and be prepared to answer tough questions, say Nadine Blackburn at United Minds and Eric Blankenbaker at Weber Shandwick.

  • Tackling Judge-Shopping Concerns While Honoring Localism

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    As the debate continues over judge-shopping and case assignments in federal court, policymakers should look to a hybrid model that preserves the benefits of localism for those cases that warrant it, while preventing the appearance of judge-shopping for cases of a more national or widespread character, says Joshua Sohn at the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Perspectives

    How Attorneys Can Help Combat Anti-Asian Hate

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    Amid an exponential increase in violence against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, unique obstacles stand in the way of accountability and justice — but lawyers can effect powerful change by raising awareness, offering legal representation, advocating for victims’ rights and more, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

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