Media & Entertainment

  • February 20, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Seeks June Trial Date In 'Rust' Shooting

    Alec Baldwin's attorney urged a New Mexico judge Tuesday to set a June trial date for the actor on involuntary manslaughter charges in the shooting death of "Rust" cinematographer Halyna Hutchins.

  • February 20, 2024

    FCC Panel To Focus On AI's Consumer Impact

    The Federal Communications Commission set a consumer advisory panel back into motion Tuesday, with the impact of artificial intelligence on the telecom industry as a top priority.

  • February 20, 2024

    Media & Entertainment Group Of The Year: Davis Polk

    Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP negotiated deals that allowed NBCUniversal to expand its streaming platform to sub-Saharan Africa and Taboola to power native advertising on Yahoo-owned websites, plus defeated a $177 million lawsuit against longtime client Comcast, landing the firm a spot among Law360's Media & Entertainment Groups of the Year.

  • February 20, 2024

    Hogan Lovells Repping Walmart In $2.3B Vizio Takeover

    Hogan Lovells-led Walmart Inc. announced its plans Tuesday to buy private smart television manufacturer Vizio in a $2.3 billion deal that will provide the retail giant with more places to sell ads and appeal to shoppers.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Denies Review Of Wrestler Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a petition from an attorney seeking to vacate a $312,000 sanctions order over his representation of former wrestlers over brain injuries they suffered while working for World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

  • February 16, 2024

    'No Respect': 2nd Circ. Judge Chides Dissatisfied Arb. Users

    A Chinese cinema magnate's argument that he was inadequately notified of an arbitration that led to a $457 million penalty had a Second Circuit judge invoking the 1972 classic film "The Godfather" on Friday, as he criticized parties who only come to court to complain after the fact.

  • February 16, 2024

    MrBeast Can't Toss Restaurant Co.'s Burger Deal Countersuit

    A New York judge refused Friday to toss contract breach counterclaims against YouTube personality MrBeast filed by his restaurant business partner, Virtual Dining Concepts, over his tweets about a burger ghost kitchen deal gone awry, finding they didn't fall within the scope of New York's anti-SLAPP law.

  • February 16, 2024

    Bid To Ax Calif. Kids' Digital Safety Law Gets Diverse Backing

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the American Civil Liberties Union, more than a dozen media organizations and a slew of other business and consumer advocacy groups are urging the Ninth Circuit to preserve a ruling temporarily halting a new California law that requires social media platforms to bolster their privacy protections for children.

  • February 16, 2024

    Unshackled Calif. Privacy Agency To Bring Enforcement Heat

    California's privacy regulator is expected to not waste any time responding to a recent ruling that cleared the way for the fledgling agency to begin immediately enforcing the rules it's crafted under the state's data protection law, making it vital for businesses and employers to adjust their compliance efforts to meet the accelerated timeline. 

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Fox News Staffer Ends Suit Alleging Sex Assault By Ailes

    A former Fox News booking director has dropped her suit accusing the company of inaction when the late executive Roger Ailes allegedly sexually assaulted her, according to a joint stipulation filed in New York state court on Friday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Jimmy Iovine Accuser Ends NY Sex Assault Suit

    An unnamed woman who accused Interscope Records co-founder Jimmy Iovine of sexual abuse and battery has dropped her legal claims, according to a Thursday filing in New York state court.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOL To Appeal Disclosure Of Contractor Demographic Reports

    The U.S. Department of Labor says it will appeal a ruling from a California federal judge requiring it to cough up thousands of federal contractors' workforce demographic reports that the judge said were not protected from disclosure as either commercial data or trade secrets.

  • February 16, 2024

    FCC Needs Enforcement Ombudsman, Ex-Agency Atty Says

    The Federal Communications Commission should consider a wide range of enforcement-related reforms, including creating an ombudsman's office to help companies navigate disputes that crop up during FCC investigations, a former agency general counsel has argued in a new industry-backed paper.

  • February 16, 2024

    Mayer Brown Denies Knowing Of 'Disturbing' Flint PR Effort

    A Mayer Brown LLP partner representing Veolia North America, the water engineering firm facing negligence claims from children exposed to lead in Flint, Michigan, told a Michigan federal judge Friday that his team didn't know about Veolia's public relations campaign disparaging the children's counsel, a campaign the judge labeled a "disturbing development."

  • February 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Comcast Patent Case, And Warns Its Atty

    The Federal Circuit on Friday revived a patent suit against Comcast over voice recognition technology, finding that a lower court misinterpreted the patents, and reprimanded a Comcast attorney from Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP for exceeding word counts in a brief in a related case.

  • February 16, 2024

    Meet The Attys Arguing Copyright Damages Row At Top Court

    The attorneys who will face off before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday in a copyright dispute that could expand the timeline for available damages are both well-respected appellate litigators who have spent plenty of time in the spotlight of big cases.

  • February 16, 2024

    VanEck Pays SEC $1.75M Over Influencer Role In ETF Launch

    Financial product issuer VanEck agreed to pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission a $1.75 million penalty over allegations it failed to disclose how it paid influencer Dave Portnoy to boost the launch of its social media-tied fund to the product's board.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Reverses Injunction In Adventure Parks IP Suit

    The Federal Circuit has reversed a Texas federal judge's decision to preliminarily block Kangaroo LLC from operating a part of its trampoline park using certain colors, saying the lower court didn't make "the requisite findings" to justify the injunction, and the injunction request fails on the merits.

  • February 16, 2024

    Jewish Teacher Says Bias Suit Dismissal Flouted Case Law

    A Jewish middle school teacher who claims she faced unfair treatment at work due to her religion and repercussions for posting on Facebook about an assault by a student has urged a federal judge to rethink an early win granted to her school district against her retaliation and bias claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    FCC Offers Incentives So Small Carriers Can Use Spectrum

    The Federal Communications Commission's new program to encourage spectrum licensees to divvy up their unused airwaves for sublease to smaller and more rural carriers is now up and running and accepting applications.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Off The Bench: NHL Antitrust, Daily Fantasy Dread, ESPN Bet

    In this week's Off the Bench, the NHL faces allegations of a vast, exploitative antitrust scheme, daily fantasy operators continue facing heat from state regulators, and New York gets a new sports betting player as ESPN Bet hits the Empire State.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Texas Justices Ax ADA's Defamation Suit Against Newspaper

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday reversed a state appellate decision in a case involving a small-town newspaper, an infamous wrongful conviction and a publicly snubbed assistant district attorney, ruling that the case should have been dismissed and that the Polk County Publishing Co.'s characterization of the assistant DA was legal.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

Expert Analysis

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

    Author Photo

    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Opinion

    9th Circ. Should Overturn The Miles Davis Tattoo Ruling

    Author Photo

    A California district court made several missteps that led to a finding that celebrity artist Kat Von D's Miles Davis tattoo did not infringe copyright, and the Ninth Circuit should overturn the decision because recent U.S. Supreme Court guidance was ignored and the jury did not receive adequate instruction, says Brian Moriarty at Hamilton Brook.

  • Is Compulsory Copyright Licensing Needed For AI Tech?

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Copyright Office's inquiry into whether Congress should establish a compulsory licensing regime for artificial intelligence technologies that are trained on copyrighted works has received relatively little attention — but commenters recently opposed the regime under three key themes, say Michael Kientzle and Ryan White at Arnold & Porter.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Latest Antitrust Areas For In-House Counsel To Watch

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's increasingly aggressive approach to antitrust enforcement means in-house counsel should closely monitor five key compliance issues, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • NCAA's Antitrust Litigation History Offers Clues For NIL Case

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Perkins Coie analyze the NCAA's long history of antitrust litigation to predict how state attorney general claims against NCAA recruiting rules surrounding name, image and likeness discussions will stand up in Tennessee federal court.

  • SAG-AFTRA Contract Is A Landmark For AI And IP Interplay

    Author Photo

    SAG-AFTRA's recently ratified contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers introduced a framework to safeguard performers' intellectual property rights and set the stage for future discussions on how those rights interact with artificial intelligence — which should put entertainment businesses on alert for compliance, says Evynne Grover at QBE.

  • A Refresher On Alcohol Sponsorships Before The Super Bowl

    Author Photo

    As millions of people will see in Super Bowl commercials Sunday, celebrity sponsorships continue to be a valuable tool for alcohol beverage marketers — and those looking to better target audiences must understand how regulation of the alcohol industry affects these deals, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • What New Calif. Strike Force Means For White Collar Crimes

    Author Photo

    The recently announced Central District of California strike force targeting complex corporate and securities fraud — following the Northern District of California's model — combines experienced prosecutorial leadership and partnerships with federal agencies like the IRS and FBI, and could result in an uptick in the number of cases and speed of proceedings, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

    Author Photo

    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

    Author Photo

    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!