Immigration

  • February 16, 2024

    Texas County Says State's Migrant Arrest Law Will Raise Costs

    Texas' Harris County urged a federal court to grant the Biden administration's bid to block an impending state law that would allow Texas to arrest and deport migrants, saying the law, if enforced, would lead to increased jail-related costs.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOL Faulted For Not Explaining Ala. Sonic's H-2B Visa Denial

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has given the operator of an Alabama Sonic Drive-In another chance at temporarily hiring foreign cooks to help out in warm months, ruling that a certifying officer denied an application for the H-2B visa program without a satisfactory explanation.

  • February 16, 2024

    Union Can't Intervene In Fight Over NY Farm Laborers Law

    The United Farm Workers can't intervene in a case over a state law covering protections for agricultural workers, a New York federal judge ruled Friday, saying the union's interests in organizing and upholding the statute won't be harmed.

  • February 16, 2024

    House Lawmakers Unveil $66.3B Military, Border Bill

    A bipartisan group of U.S. House of Representatives lawmakers introduced legislation on Friday that would provide $66.32 billion to support Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, as well as enact border reforms.

  • February 16, 2024

    Green Card Approvals Sink To All Time Low

    The United States' green card approval rate hit a historic low amid visa caps, with only 3% of those with pending green card applications on track to receive permanent residency in fiscal year 2024, the Cato Institute reported Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    GAO Rejects Protests Against ICE Air Charter Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office denied two protests related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement solicitation for air charter services for transportation of noncitizens in federal custody, according to two decisions published Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Texas Migrant Arrest Law Needs 'A Lot More Care,' Judge Says

    A Texas federal judge Thursday seemed poised to block a controversial state law that would permit the state to arrest and deport migrants, telling attorneys for the state that the statute may lead to a patchwork of immigration law akin to "the kind of thing the Civil War said you can't do."

  • February 15, 2024

    HHS Watchdog Finds Lax Vetting For Migrant Kid Sponsors

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services was lackadaisical in vetting sponsors taking custody of children who migrated to the U.S. alone and did not always do timely safety checks after their release, according to a report Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    9th Circ. Unconvinced That Theft Doesn't Warrant Removal

    A Mexican man fighting deportation after he was convicted of robbery couldn't convince the Ninth Circuit that the state robbery law supporting his conviction was too broad to force his removal.

  • February 15, 2024

    ICE Reaches Settlement Over Mistaken Raid On Couple

    The government has reached a settlement with an elderly Boston woman and the estate of her longtime partner over a mistaken 2019 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement raid on their apartment by agents who had the wrong address for a suspect, according to a Thursday court filing.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Judge Sends Migrant Busing Suit Back To State Court

    A state court will hear the New York City social services commissioner's $708 million lawsuit seeking to hold charter companies liable for Texas' migrant busing policies, after a New York federal court ruled Wednesday that the case does not raise federal questions.

  • February 14, 2024

    GOP Senator Wants Confirmation Hearing On Labor Secretary

    Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., called on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions to hold another hearing on the nomination of Julie Su to the position of secretary of labor, arguing that Su's record as acting secretary deserves public scrutiny.

  • February 14, 2024

    Investors Urge Prison As Developers Seek More Briefing Time

    Two real estate developers on Wednesday asked for more time to respond to EB-5 investors' request that they be imprisoned for hiding their money instead of paying overdue settlements and sanctions judgments, telling an Illinois federal judge their attorney wrote down the court's deadline incorrectly.

  • February 14, 2024

    House Rep. Green Plans Retirement After Mayorkas Fight

    Rep. Mark Green, R-Tenn., chair of the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, said Wednesday evening he will not seek reelection, an announcement that comes one day after he led the impeachment of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security secretary.

  • February 14, 2024

    DHS Warns Of Reduced Operations With Budget Shortfall

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is warning it may have to pare back border security initiatives and removal procedures, while green card and asylum backlogs worsen, if Congress doesn't provide additional funding, per a Wednesday email to Law360.

  • February 14, 2024

    Va. Farms Settle H-2A Workers' Allegations Of OT Violations

    A wage dispute lodged by two Mexican farmworkers who accused a Virginia agricultural association and two farms of cheating them and other temporary agricultural workers out of over $2.5 million in overtime pay is now settled, the parties said Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Deputy AG Warns Of Harsher Penalties For Crimes Aided By AI

    Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco on Wednesday said the U.S. Department of Justice will seek harsher penalties for crimes committed with the aid of artificial intelligence, calling the technology a "double-edged sword" that can be exploited by criminals but utilized by prosecutors with the right controls in place.

  • February 14, 2024

    DOL Extends Deadline For Input On Foreign Worker Jobs

    The U.S. Department of Labor said Wednesday that it is giving the public more time to provide comments on its plan to expand its list of occupations eligible for employment-based green cards based on domestic worker shortages.

  • February 14, 2024

    NY Immigrant Settles Green Card Case Alleging Atty Fraud

    A New York resident has reached an agreement with several immigration officials concerning the denial of his green card application on fraud grounds, which he blamed on a consultancy firm and a disbarred attorney, according to a stipulation of dismissal filed in New York federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Blasts 'Chicanery' Suit As Bid For 'Payday'

    Fox Rothschild LLP ripped into a malpractice lawsuit by two men alleging the firm mishandled their immigration matters as "chicanery" in pursuit of a payout from the firm and urged a New Jersey federal court to dismiss their second amended complaint with prejudice.

  • February 13, 2024

    House GOP Passes Measure To Impeach DHS Secretary

    The U.S. House of Representatives voted Tuesday in favor of impeaching Alejandro Mayorkas, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, over claims of "willful and systemic refusal to comply with the law" and "breach of public trust" for his management of the southern border, after a failed attempt last week.

  • February 13, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says Evidence Overlooked In Somali's Torture Claims

    The Third Circuit on Tuesday revived a Somali man's deportation relief bid based on claims he'd likely be tortured for returning to Somalia from the U.S. and for belonging to a minority group, ruling that an immigration judge ignored evidence of his risks.

  • February 13, 2024

    Immigrants Seek To Certify Class Of 170,000 With Visa Delays

    A group of immigrants asked a Michigan federal judge Monday to certify a class of more than 170,000 immigrants accusing the government of mishandling its program of distributing so-called U-visas to immigrant victims of crime, arguing that the court can resolve their allegations of unreasonable delays on a classwide basis.

  • February 13, 2024

    Prior Sham Marriage Bars Immigration Bid, 4th Circ. Rules

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services properly denied a Czech man's bid for lawful permanent residency status as the spouse of a U.S. citizen because his earlier marriage to another American woman was fraudulent, the Fourth Circuit ruled.

  • February 13, 2024

    11th Circ. Wants Jurisdiction Review In Migrant Release Suits

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday ordered a Florida federal judge to decide if a U.S. Supreme Court decision reviving the Biden administration's immigration enforcement priorities affects the district court's authority to kill two unrelated policies on letting in migrants at the border.

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Expert Analysis

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

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