Policy & Compliance

  • April 19, 2024

    Allergan To Face Kickback Claim In Suit Over Child Botox Use

    A Texas federal judge has axed allegations that pharmaceutical company Allergan Inc. defrauded the U.S. government when it promoted the unapproved use of Botox to treat migraines in children but will allow claims that the company bribed doctors to conduct the procedure to move forward.

  • April 19, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Abortions & Presidential Immunity

    The U.S. Supreme Court will return Monday for the term's final week of oral arguments, during which it will consider several high-stakes disputes, including whether a federal healthcare law can preempt state abortion bans and whether former President Donald Trump is entitled to immunity from criminal charges related to official acts.

  • April 19, 2024

    'Anti-Vax Momma' Admits To Selling Fake Immunization Creds

    A woman who went by the Instagram handle @AntiVaxMomma pled guilty on Friday to selling fake U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccination cards and falsely registering buyers in New York state's immunization database.

  • April 19, 2024

    Feds Want Prison For Ga. Chiropractor In NBA Health Fraud

    Federal prosecutors have asked a New York federal judge to impose a 10- to 16-month prison sentence for a chiropractor who admitted to conspiring with former Celtics forward Glen "Big Baby" Davis to commit healthcare and wire fraud by submitting fake invoices to the NBA health plan.

  • April 18, 2024

    Jury Awards $98M To Wash. Healthcare Workers In Wage Suit

    A Seattle jury said Thursday a Washington-based healthcare system should pay thousands of its employees almost $100 million for its illegal timeclock rounding and meal break practices, an award that's expected to be doubled because a judge has already determined that the company's violations were willful.

  • April 18, 2024

    Clinic Head Gets 9 Years For Medicare Kickback, Tax Scheme

    A health clinic manager was sentenced to nine years in prison and ordered to pay $40 million in restitution to the government for participating in a multimillion-dollar healthcare kickback scheme that involved tax fraud, according to documents in a New York federal court.

  • April 18, 2024

    Endo Pleads Guilty To Marketing Opioids As 'Crush Proof'

    Endo Health Solutions Inc. pled guilty Thursday in Michigan federal court to putting out a drug it falsely advertised as being "crush proof" and "abuse deterrent," part of its larger agreement with the government to resolve nearly $2 billion in civil and criminal claims against the company.

  • April 18, 2024

    Would-Be Whistleblowers Drop ER Service Overbilling Claims

    A North Carolina federal judge has granted two whistleblowers' request to drop their suit accusing a pair of healthcare companies and their affiliates of overcharging both state and federal Medicare and Medicaid programs for emergency services provided at multiple regional hospitals, dismissing the case without prejudice.

  • April 18, 2024

    FDA Head Gets GOP Rep.'s Rebuke Over Pot Rescheduling

    The Republican chair of a U.S. House of Representatives Appropriations subcommittee on Thursday chided the commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the agency's recommendation last year to loosen restrictions on marijuana.

  • April 17, 2024

    Lab Whistleblower Drops COVID Test Suit After Feds Pass

    An ex-lab director has dropped his False Claims Act lawsuit alleging he was ousted from a diagnostic testing firm for raising concerns about regulatory violations and improper billing of federal health care programs, closing his Washington federal court case just days after the government declined to intervene.

  • April 17, 2024

    FDA's Foot-Dragging On Menthol Ban Sparks Frustration

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's yearslong delay to ban menthol has left public health groups frustrated over why the agency has failed to act on what the groups see as an obvious way to improve public health and prevent needless deaths, prompting a second lawsuit over taking menthol off store shelves.

  • April 17, 2024

    'Ringleader' Of Black Market HIV Drug Scam Gets 9 Years

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday sentenced a pharmacy operator to nine years in prison for spearheading a $13 million scheme to sell black market HIV medication and collect fraudulent reimbursements from Medicaid and Medicare.

  • April 16, 2024

    Eli Lilly's Insulin Price Cap Deal Collapses After Cert. Denial

    Eli Lilly & Co. and insulin buyers have called off a proposed nationwide settlement that would've capped insulin prices and been worth up to $500 million over several years, a decision that was made after the buyers lost a class certification bid early this year, according to the buyers' counsel.

  • April 16, 2024

    Healthcare Industry Sees Spate Of New Data Sharing Suits

    A $7 million-plus settlement between a federal regulator and a mental healthcare provider accused of improperly sharing patient data highlights the ubiquitous ties between health systems and tech giants like Facebook — and the growing legal and regulatory scrutiny over those relationships.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ohio Bans On Transgender Care, Youth Sports Halted By Judge

    An Ohio state court on Tuesday blocked a law that bans gender-affirming healthcare for children and prohibits transgender girls from competing in girls' school sports, issuing a temporary restraining order more than a week before the statute was to go into effect.

  • April 16, 2024

    NY High Court Zeroes In On Abortion Coverage Exemptions

    New York's highest court grappled Tuesday with whether a state regulation's exemption process shielding religious groups from a requirement that employee health plans cover abortions conflicted with a 2021 U.S. Supreme Court decision, with multiple judges questioning the constitutionality of the carveout procedure.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-NBA Guard Gets 18 Months In Healthcare Scheme

    A former Detroit Pistons point guard was sentenced to 18 months in prison Tuesday after being convicted of one of two counts over an alleged scheme to defraud the NBA's healthcare plan, with a Manhattan federal judge saying his proceeds were "not chump change" and faulting his behavior on pretrial release.

  • April 16, 2024

    As Hospitals Hire Outside Help, Who's Liable If Patients Sue?

    A medical malpractice case that’s triggered repeated disagreement in Michigan courts underscores the complexity of hospital "agent" liability amid increasing healthcare industry reliance on contractor nurses and doctors.

  • April 16, 2024

    Knotty Preemption Inquiry Awaits High Court In Abortion Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court next week will hear a dispute over an Idaho abortion ban and a federal emergency care law. The case promises to challenge the court to decide whether the two vastly different statutes actually conflict.

  • April 16, 2024

    Va. Hospital System Beats COVID Vaccine Bias Suit

    A Virginia healthcare system defeated a suit claiming it unlawfully refused to excuse two Christian employees from its COVID-19 vaccination requirement, with a federal judge finding they could have taken a version of the vaccine that didn't conflict with their religious beliefs.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-FDA Chief On Election Year Healthcare Policy

    Former FDA chief counsel Stacy Cline Amin of Morrison Foerster LLP talks to Law360 about march-in rights, the Inflation Reduction Act and healthcare policy issues in a presidential election year.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Face Off Over Shadow Docket Procedures

    The U.S. Supreme Court's internal disagreements over how to manage its emergency docket were on full display Monday in its decision allowing Idaho to enforce a ban on gender-affirming care for minors — a case the court's liberals said wasn't worthy of their intervention, but its conservatives touted as a win in the fight against universal injunctions.

  • April 15, 2024

    Mental Health Co. Cerebral To Pay $7M Over Data Failures

    Mental health service provider Cerebral Inc. will pay more than $7 million to settle claims from the Federal Trade Commission, saying it failed to protect users' sensitive health data and made it difficult for patients to cancel services and stop recurring charges, according to a Monday court filing.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Allow Idaho To Enforce Gender Care Ban, Sans Plaintiffs

    The U.S. Supreme Court allowed the state of Idaho on Monday to begin enforcing its ban on gender-affirming care for minors, reshaping a preliminary injunction the majority said was far too broad to keep in place as the litigation plays out, perhaps for years.

  • April 15, 2024

    Feds Seek Prison For Group That Invaded Abortion Clinic

    Prosecutors are seeking prison sentences for six anti-abortion activists convicted of storming a Washington, D.C., abortion clinic, including a six-year term for the alleged "criminal mastermind" behind this and other blockades.

Expert Analysis

  • SEC's Life Sciences Actions Utilize Novel Tools And Theories

    Author Photo

    Recent enforcement actions show that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is employing new forms of data analytics and noteworthy applications of insider trading laws in its scrutiny of fraud within the life sciences and health industries, say Edward Imperatore and Jina Choi at MoFo.

  • ESG Around The World: Japan

    Author Photo

    Japan is witnessing rapid developments in environmental, social and corporate governance policies by making efforts to adopt a soft law approach, which has been effective in encouraging companies to embrace ESG practices and address the diversity of boards of directors, say Akira Karasawa and Landry Guesdon at Iwata Godo.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

    Author Photo

    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Potential Broader Effects Of FDA's Lab-Developed Test Rule

    Author Photo

    Though it's unclear whether the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's proposed rule for regulating lab-developed tests will ever go into effect, it nonetheless functions as a threatened hammer that may make legislative efforts to regulate such tests more palatable, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

    Author Photo

    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • 2 New Ways FDA Is Changing Lab-Developed Test Regulation

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's recently announced rulemaking and voluntary pilot program signal the agency's dedication to ramping up oversight of lab-developed tests, which have been largely unregulated by the FDA until now, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

    Author Photo

    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • AGs' Distaste For Food Bill May Signal Other State Issues

    Author Photo

    States' recent opposition to a proposed federal law that would block them from regulating out-of-state agricultural production could affect issues beyond this narrow debate, such as the balance of state and federal regulatory power, reproductive rights post-Dobbs, and energy production and water use, say Christopher Allen and Stephen Cobb at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

    Author Photo

    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • What An NCAA Drug Test Change Could Mean For Cannabis

    Author Photo

    If the NCAA follows through with its decision to remove cannabis from its banned list of substances, it will affect college athletes, athletic directors, public relations employees, and marketing departments at universities and colleges, and it will have a significant economic effect on the cannabis industry, say Stanley Jutkowitz and Sydney Jenkins at Seyfarth.

  • When Calif. Health Shield Law Reaches Beyond State Borders

    Author Photo

    In light of California's newly signed shield law to increase protections for reproductive health and gender-affirming care, it's important to understand how the law's covered services and key legal protections could affect patients and providers nationwide, says Natalie Birnbaum at Nelson Hardiman.

  • FDA's Lab-Developed Test Rule Faces High Hurdles

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's recently announced plans to explicitly regulate lab-developed tests will likely face resistance from industry stakeholders and congressional actions, and lead to significant litigation, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • FTC's Health Co. Suit Indicates Agency's Private Equity Focus

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's latest lawsuit against an anesthesia company and its private equity investor highlights the agency's willingness to regulate the health care industry even when relevant acquisitions are relatively dated or when the controlling entity's economic interest is under 50%, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.