Food & Beverage

  • February 20, 2024

    Fiji Water Microplastics Suit Heads To Illinois Federal Court

    The Wonderful Company LLC has removed to Illinois federal court a proposed false advertising class action accusing it of misleading consumers by labeling its Fiji Water as "natural artisan water" while knowing it contained microplastics.

  • February 16, 2024

    MrBeast Can't Toss Restaurant Co.'s Burger Deal Countersuit

    A New York judge refused Friday to toss contract breach counterclaims against YouTube personality MrBeast filed by his restaurant business partner, Virtual Dining Concepts, over his tweets about a burger ghost kitchen deal gone awry, finding they didn't fall within the scope of New York's anti-SLAPP law.

  • February 16, 2024

    Hydro Co. Must Alter, Not Remove, Dam That's Killing Salmon

    A Washington federal judge on Friday said a hydroelectric company must remove part of a rock dam structure killing endangered wild salmon, but the judge declined to order complete removal, saying it went beyond a narrowly tailored remedy zeroing in on what is harming fish.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOL Faulted For Not Explaining Ala. Sonic's H-2B Visa Denial

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has given the operator of an Alabama Sonic Drive-In another chance at temporarily hiring foreign cooks to help out in warm months, ruling that a certifying officer denied an application for the H-2B visa program without a satisfactory explanation.

  • February 16, 2024

    Oat Milk Co. Settles Greenwashing Investor Suit For $9.25M

    Investors suing Swedish alternative milk manufacturer Oatly asked a New York federal judge Friday to preliminarily approve a $9.25 million deal to settle claims that the company pitched its business as more environmentally friendly than it is.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Union Can't Intervene In Fight Over NY Farm Laborers Law

    The United Farm Workers can't intervene in a case over a state law covering protections for agricultural workers, a New York federal judge ruled Friday, saying the union's interests in organizing and upholding the statute won't be harmed.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Gov't Wants More Alaskan Native Reps On Subsistence Board

    The U.S. government has plans to strengthen Alaskan Native tribal representation on its Federal Subsistence Board, saying the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have proposed a new rule to add board members with personal experience of subsistence living in rural Alaska.

  • February 16, 2024

    Feds Tell 1st Circ. Mass. Wind Farm Approval Was Sound

    The federal government has said a Massachusetts federal judge properly dumped a challenge lodged by commercial fishing groups seeking to upend federal approvals of the Vineyard Wind project, telling the First Circuit that the record shows federal agencies thoroughly studied the project's potential impacts.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fruit Grower Gets OK For $11M DIP Draw After Lender Deal

    Bankrupt fruit producer Prima Wawona received interim approval Friday for an $11 million draw on its $22 million in Chapter 11 financing after saying it had reached a deal with objecting lenders on the financing and was working on a deal for its overall bankruptcy plan.

  • February 16, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Adds FDA Expert From Emord & Associates

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has hired a shareholder in Phoenix who spent over 16 years with boutique Emord & Associates PC to continue his practice counseling businesses regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on a range of compliance matters, the firm announced Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Humane Society's Poultry Slaughter Suit May Need An Update

    A California federal magistrate judge on Thursday told the Humane Society and other nonprofits suing the U.S. Department of Agriculture for waiving limits on the pace of poultry slaughtering that they may need to file an amended complaint due to new regulations implemented since the suit was filed.

  • February 15, 2024

    Enviro Orgs Sue EPA Over PFAS Data For Plastic Containers

    Two environmental groups accused the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday of withholding test data on the presence of forever chemicals in fluorinated plastic containers in response to their Freedom of Information Act request.

  • February 15, 2024

    Restaurant Franchise Owner Hit With $30.7M Jury Verdict

    A Dallas County, Texas, jury has returned a $30.7 million verdict against major restaurant franchise company Sun Holdings Inc. and its owner in favor of an executive who claimed they refused to pay him his fair share of profits for operating nearly 150 Popeyes eateries.

  • February 15, 2024

    Wash. Nonprofit Owes $250K For Produce, Suit Says

    A Washington state-based produce company alleged in a federal court complaint this week that a nonprofit has failed to pay it $250,000 for shipments of fresh fruit and vegetables despite receiving funds from a state program that helps provide emergency food for people experiencing hunger.

  • February 15, 2024

    Gerber, Others Fight Bid For MDL On Baby Food Heavy Metals

    A group of baby food manufacturers, including Gerber Products Co., The Hain Celestial Group Inc. and Beech-Nut Nutrition Co., is urging the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation not to consolidate suits alleging that heavy metals in their products cause autism spectrum disorder and other conditions, saying there's no benefit to grouping them in an MDL.

  • February 15, 2024

    Shoppers Say Albertsons-Kroger Suit Shortcomings Fixed

    Consumers challenging Kroger's $24.6 billion bid for Albertsons defended their revised lawsuit in California federal court against the supermarkets' latest dismissal bid, arguing their tweaked complaint now adequately identifies the affected stores and lays out how the deal threatens competition.

  • February 15, 2024

    Damaged Champagne Cargo Row Can Proceed, Judge Says

    A New Jersey federal judge preserved the majority of a $930,000 coverage dispute over a damaged champagne shipment Thursday, denying a logistics company's bid for dismissal while giving an insurer the opportunity to put forth an alternate pleading.

  • February 15, 2024

    Club, Insurer Resolve Fiduciary Breach Coverage Row

    A country club owner, various club board members and Selective Insurance Co. agreed to dismiss their dispute Thursday in Massachusetts federal court over coverage for breach of contract and fiduciary duty claims that club investors lodged in arbitration, resolving the coverage case after reaching a settlement in January.

  • February 15, 2024

    Instant Brands May Have Rights Against Supplier, Judge Says

    A Texas bankruptcy judge issued a tentative ruling that could favor appliance and housewares maker Instant Brands in its dispute with a supplier objecting to the Chapter 11 plan's treatment of indemnification claims.

  • February 15, 2024

    Marketing Co. Asks Justices To Hear 'Impossible' TM Row

    Illinois-based marketing consulting firm Impossible X LLC has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a decision from a divided Ninth Circuit that revived plant-based burger maker Impossible Foods Inc.'s trademark lawsuit against it.

  • February 15, 2024

    No Coverage For Pandemic Losses, NY Top Court Rules

    A Texas-based restaurant operator isn't entitled to insurance coverage for its pandemic losses, New York's top court ruled Thursday, saying the operator didn't allege the kind of physical loss or damage required for coverage.

  • February 15, 2024

    AGs Press FDA On Safeguards Against Metal In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from states across the country urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration once again on Thursday to establish requirements that baby food producers test for lead and other metals in products headed for store shelves, citing a recent wave of childhood lead poisoning connected to recalled applesauce pouches.  

Expert Analysis

  • Reducing The Risk Of PFAS False Advertising Class Actions

    Author Photo

    A wave of class actions continues to pummel products that allegedly contain per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, with plaintiffs challenging advertising that they say misleads consumers by implying an absence of PFAS — but there are steps companies can take to minimize risk, say attorneys at Keller and Heckman.

  • Aldi Design Infringement Case Highlights Assessment Issues

    Author Photo

    The forthcoming English Court of Appeal decision in Marks and Spencer v. Aldi, regarding the alleged infringement of design rights, could provide practitioners with new guidance, particularly in relation to the relevant date for assessment of infringement and the weight that should be attributed to certain design elements in making this assessment, say Rory Graham and Georgia Davis at RPC.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

    Author Photo

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • How Recent Laws Affect Foreign Purchase Of US Real Estate

    Author Photo

    Early diligence is imperative for U.S. real estate transactions involving foreign actors, including analysis of federal and state foreign investment laws implicated by the transaction, depending on the property's nature and location, the parties' citizenship, and the transaction's structure, say Massimo D’Angelo and Anthony Rapa at Blank Rome.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Corporate Disclosure Tug-Of-War's Free Speech Issues

    Author Photo

    The continuing conflict over corporate disclosure requirements — highlighted by a lawsuit against Missouri's anti-ESG rules — has important implications not just for investors and regulated entities but also for broader questions about the scope of the First Amendment, say Colin Pohlman, and Jane Luxton and Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

  • A Refresher On Alcohol Sponsorships Before The Super Bowl

    Author Photo

    As millions of people will see in Super Bowl commercials Sunday, celebrity sponsorships continue to be a valuable tool for alcohol beverage marketers — and those looking to better target audiences must understand how regulation of the alcohol industry affects these deals, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Opinion

    Food Safety Bill Needed To Protect Kids From Heavy Metals

    Author Photo

    The recent announcement by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that hundreds of children may have been exposed to unsafe lead levels in applesauce highlights the continuing failure by Congress to pass legislation that would require baby food manufacturers to ensure safer levels of heavy metals in their products, says Vineet Dubey at Custodio & Dubey.

  • What Brands Must Know For Calif. Recycle Label Compliance

    Author Photo

    A brand that stamps nonrecyclable packaging with the chasing arrows symbol could face liability under California's new law on labeling recyclable material, so brand owners should keep an eye on the state's pending survey process to identify which materials meet the criteria before requirements go into effect, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Zimbabwe Ruling Bolsters UK's Draw As Arbitration Enforcer

    Author Photo

    An English court's recent decision in Border Timbers v. Zimbabwe, finding that state immunity was irrelevant to registering an arbitration award, emphasizes the U.K.'s reputation as a creditor-friendly destination for award enforcement, say Jon Felce and Tulsi Bhatia at Cooke Young.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

    Author Photo

    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

    Author Photo

    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!