Florida

  • February 20, 2024

    Tennis Organization Found Negligent In Pro's Sexual Assault

    A Florida federal judge has sided with tennis pro Kylie McKenzie, finding that the U.S. Tennis Association did not do enough to monitor her coach Anibal Aranda, who sexually assaulted her.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs Microsoft's PTAB Win Over 3D Patents

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board properly invalidated a pair of 3D medical imaging patents challenged by Microsoft, the Federal Circuit affirmed Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    GOP Sens. Seek Full Impeachment Trial For Mayorkas

    A group of Senate Republicans made the case on Tuesday that their Constitutional duty behooves them to hold a full impeachment trial for Alejandro Mayorkas, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, despite reservations from other Republicans in the Democratic-led Senate.

  • February 20, 2024

    Sullivan & Cromwell Accused Of Aiding FTX Fraud

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP has been accused of knowing about and helping facilitate the massive fraud that brought down cryptocurrency exchange FTX while serving as FTX's outside counsel, and  profiting on the back end by overseeing FTX's ongoing bankruptcy, according to a racketeering lawsuit filed last week.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Give Feds Time In Texas, Fla. Social Media Law Fights

    The U.S. Supreme Court has set aside time for the federal government to weigh in on looming oral arguments in cases to determine the constitutionality of controversial Texas and Florida laws that restrict social media companies' ability to curb users' speech.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fla. Bills Limiting Toxic Tort Damages Headed To Floor

    Two business-backed bills that could sharply limit the ability of toxic tort victims to recover damages from polluters who violate their permits are poised to hit the floors of both houses of the Florida Legislature, despite concerns that they could embolden polluters and leave certain claimants — like commercial fishing operators — without remedy.

  • February 16, 2024

    Meet The Attys Arguing Copyright Damages Row At Top Court

    The attorneys who will face off before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday in a copyright dispute that could expand the timeline for available damages are both well-respected appellate litigators who have spent plenty of time in the spotlight of big cases.

  • February 16, 2024

    Family Of 23-Year-Old Who Died From Ulcer Gets $30M

    A Florida state jury awarded $30 million to the family of a 23-year-old woman who died from an untreated ulcer at a Tampa hospital after finding the two doctors entrusted with her care liable for negligence.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Florida Loses Wetland Permitting Authority In D.C. Court Case

    A D.C. judge has stripped Florida of its federally delegated authority to permit wetlands development, ruling that U.S. environmental regulators failed to analyze the impact of their decision on endangered and threatened species and handing a victory to conservation groups challenging the program.

  • February 16, 2024

    Condo Co., Insurer Settle Proposed Class Action Coverage

    A Miami condominium, its former management company and various insurers agreed to settle coverage for a proposed class action accusing the condominium companies of allowing the building to deteriorate, a Florida federal judge said Friday, staying the coverage litigation while the parties finalize the deal.

  • February 16, 2024

    Littler Hit With DQ Bid For Wielding Mistakenly Produced Doc

    Littler Mendelson PC has gained an "unfair advantage" and should be booted from defending a Florida pharmacy services company for using an inadvertently produced, privileged document in a deposition last week, a woman suing the company for whistleblower retaliation said.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Telemedicine Exec Admits $110M Medicare Fraud Scheme

    A Florida man agreed to plead guilty to orchestrating a $110 million Medicare fraud scheme using telemedicine and telemarketing companies to generate falsified orders for knee braces and other medical equipment, Boston federal prosecutors said Friday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Firms Connected To 1MDB Scandal Seek Ch. 15 In US

    Liquidators overseeing the bankruptcies of five alleged shell companies that they say received an estimated $1.5 billion from 1Malaysia Development Bhd., a Malaysian government-owned fund at the heart of an international corruption scandal, asked a Florida bankruptcy court to grant Chapter 15 recognition of their British Virgin Islands liquidations.

  • February 15, 2024

    Justices To Hear IP Case That Could Cap Copyright Payouts

    Payouts in copyright disputes could be capped to three years from the date of alleged infringement or go back much further after the U.S. Supreme Court considers the long-lingering question of whether the statute of limitations on copyright restricts damages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Fla. Court Says Alumni Group Can't Use College's Trademarks

    A Florida federal judge permanently barred the use of a private college's trademarks by an alumni association on Thursday, saying in an order that the group is prohibited from "making or displaying any statement or representation" that's likely to make people believe members are linked to the university.

  • February 15, 2024

    Fla. Watchdog Warns Fantasy Sports Outfits To Scram

    The Florida Gaming Control Commission warned three online fantasy sports operators they will be facing potential criminal prosecution if they do not cease operating in the state soon, and at least one said on Thursday that it plans to shut down in the state by the end of the month.

  • February 15, 2024

    Restaurant Franchise Owner Hit With $30.7M Jury Verdict

    A Dallas County, Texas, jury has returned a $30.7 million verdict against major restaurant franchise company Sun Holdings Inc. and its owner in favor of an executive who claimed they refused to pay him his fair share of profits for operating nearly 150 Popeyes eateries.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ga. Univ. System Immune To Retaliation Suit, 11th Circ. Says

    An Eleventh Circuit panel on Thursday ruled Georgia's university system is immune from a former employee's retaliation suit since it acted as an arm of the state even while administering federal funding for a children's Head Start program.

  • February 15, 2024

    America First Legal Says Disney Favors Women, Minorities

    A group founded by former Trump adviser Stephen Miller accused the Walt Disney Co. of discriminating against white men in its hiring and promotion decisions and on Wednesday asked the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to investigate.

  • February 15, 2024

    Byju's Insiders Seek Ch. 11 Dismissal, Calling It Litigation Ploy

    Affiliates of Indian tech giant Byju's U.S. arm, which are embroiled in state court litigation with the company's lender, asked a Delaware bankruptcy judge to dismiss the company's Chapter 11 case, saying the bankruptcy petition was filed to stymie the ongoing state court litigation.

  • February 15, 2024

    Bogus NSA Worker To Pay SEC $2.2M In Crypto Scam Case

    An alleged crypto fraudster who told would-be investors he was a former Marine and a onetime employee of the National Security Agency will pay over $2.2 million to end U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claims he faces in Florida federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Black-Led VC Fund Case Could Hinge On Nature Of Grants

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    Organizations whose missions involve any manner of race-conscious funding should closely monitor arguments this week in American Alliance v. Fearless Fund, a case filed against a grant program that seeks to address the gap in venture capital funding for Black women-led businesses, which will examine whether grants are charitable under Civil Rights Act Section 1981 liability, say Kali Schellenberg and John Stapleton at LeVan Stapleton, and Kenneth Trujillo at Chamberlain Hrdlicka.

  • Money Transmitter Licensing: An Issue Too Costly To Ignore

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    Money transmitter licensing has become particularly relevant in recent years as digital currencies and payment technologies have piqued regulator interest, and companies should consider whether they need to be licensed to avoid disruption of operations, as well as significant fines and penalties, says Clayton Swears at Hudson Cook.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

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