Employment

  • February 20, 2024

    Fox Rothschild AI Chief Talks 'Terrifying' Deepfakes, Biased AI

    Mark McCreary, the chief artificial intelligence and information security officer at Fox Rothschild, leads his firm's internal AI strategy and provides counsel to other law firms trying to bushwhack their path through the often murky AI legal landscape, rife with hallucinated case law citations and disturbingly real deepfakes.

  • February 20, 2024

    Posner Says Ex-Staffer's 'Lies' Warrant Harsh Sanctions

    Retired Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner is asking an Indiana federal judge to impose "the most severe sanctions" against a noted pro se litigant who claims Posner reneged on a promise to pay him to run a short-lived pro bono services organization, saying the man has repeatedly lied during litigation and improperly accused opposing counsel of perjury.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-Elections Chief Chose To Leave Job, NJ Gov Says

    New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy has urged a New Jersey state court judge to toss allegations from the Garden State's former elections chief that his civil rights were violated when he was pushed to resign in retaliation for a satirical article, arguing that he never suffered any loss because he voluntarily retired.

  • February 20, 2024

    Insurers Say Pollution Exclusion Bars Cancer Suits Defense

    An oil company accused of causing four people to develop cancer through exposure to harmful chemicals should not have coverage for its defense of the claims, according to four Nationwide units that told an Illinois federal court the company has no pollution coverage.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Question Reach Of Transportation Worker Carveout

    The U.S. Supreme Court questioned Tuesday whether there is still a need for a federal arbitration exemption for interstate transportation workers or if the century-old carveout is an "anachronism," in a case dealing with whether the exemption applies to workers only in the transportation industry.

  • February 20, 2024

    Amazon Agrees To Pay $5.5M To End COVID Screening Suit

    A group of California Amazon warehouse workers asked a federal judge to approve a $5.5 million settlement resolving a proposed collective action accusing the e-commerce giant of failing to pay workers for time they spent undergoing pre-shift COVID-19 screenings, saying it will provide them with all their alleged unpaid wages.

  • February 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Pauses Transfer Order In SpaceX, NLRB Spat

    The Fifth Circuit pressed pause on a Texas district court's order to transfer SpaceX's suit over the constitutionality of the NLRB's structure to California, staying the lower court's decision while the appeals court considers the company's petition for writ of mandamus.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Weigh Nonsignatory Arbitration Issue

    The U.S. Supreme Court won't take up an oil and gas company's bid to clear up whether a nonsignatory to an arbitration agreement may play the arbitration card, the justices said Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Won't Wade Into CSX Medical Leave Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected former CSX Transportation employees' push for review of a Fourth Circuit ruling that ended their suit claiming they were unlawfully fired for requesting medical leave.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-IBM Workers Can't Get Justices To Tackle Age Bias Battle

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday turned away a group of ex-IBM workers' bid for review of a Second Circuit ruling that said they had to pursue age bias claims in arbitration rather than court, despite their argument that the decision conflicted with high court precedent.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Fight Over Limits On Port Labor Protests

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to consider South Carolina's challenge to a Fourth Circuit ruling that allowed a dockworkers union to sue a shipping group over labor issues at a terminal at the Port of Charleston.

  • February 20, 2024

    Engineer Can't Get High Court Look At Service Dog ADA Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused on Tuesday to review a disability bias suit from a Union Pacific train engineer, leaving in place an Eighth Circuit ruling that said the company wasn't required to let the military veteran bring a service dog to work to help cope with PTSD.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justice Alito Rips 'Dangerous' Denial Of Admissions Case

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito slammed his colleagues' refusal to wade into a dispute over a Virginia high school's use of race in admissions decisions Tuesday, calling a Fourth Circuit decision upholding the policy "patently incorrect and dangerous" and the high court's willingness to let it stand "hard to understand."

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Denies Review Of Wrestler Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a petition from an attorney seeking to vacate a $312,000 sanctions order over his representation of former wrestlers over brain injuries they suffered while working for World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

  • February 20, 2024

    1st Circ. Backs Genzyme Win In Worker's Race Bias Case

    Genzyme Therapeutic Products LP saw its pretrial win in a discrimination case upheld by the First Circuit, which found that a Black manager did not offer enough proof to show that his poor performance review was the result of racial bias.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Campaign Slams Ex-Aide's Adult Survivor's Act Suit

    Donald Trump's presidential campaign asked a New York judge Friday to throw out a former aide's lawsuit alleging she was raped by her campaign supervisor, saying she can't revive time-barred claims under the Adult Survivor's Act because she isn't a New York resident and the alleged assault didn't happen there.

  • February 16, 2024

    Unshackled Calif. Privacy Agency To Bring Enforcement Heat

    California's privacy regulator is expected to not waste any time responding to a recent ruling that cleared the way for the fledgling agency to begin immediately enforcing the rules it's crafted under the state's data protection law, making it vital for businesses and employers to adjust their compliance efforts to meet the accelerated timeline. 

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Fox News Staffer Ends Suit Alleging Sex Assault By Ailes

    A former Fox News booking director has dropped her suit accusing the company of inaction when the late executive Roger Ailes allegedly sexually assaulted her, according to a joint stipulation filed in New York state court on Friday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Jimmy Iovine Accuser Ends NY Sex Assault Suit

    An unnamed woman who accused Interscope Records co-founder Jimmy Iovine of sexual abuse and battery has dropped her legal claims, according to a Thursday filing in New York state court.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOL To Appeal Disclosure Of Contractor Demographic Reports

    The U.S. Department of Labor says it will appeal a ruling from a California federal judge requiring it to cough up thousands of federal contractors' workforce demographic reports that the judge said were not protected from disclosure as either commercial data or trade secrets.

  • February 16, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds Insurer's Win In Worker's Health Bias Fight

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday rejected a former Alfa Mutual Insurance Co. worker's bid to reopen her disability discrimination suit accusing the insurer of illegally firing her to sidestep high healthcare costs related to her multiple sclerosis and severe migraines.

  • February 16, 2024

    Employment Authority: The Real Estate Contractor Dilemma

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on how the new U.S. Department of Labor's contractor rule applies to real estate agents, how a settlement shows the National Labor Relations Board general counsel's progress against noncompete agreements and a look at marital status bias. 

  • February 16, 2024

    Nat'l Security Bar Kills Ex-Raytheon Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Fifth Circuit on Thursday refused to revive an engineer's claims that he was fired by defense contractor Raytheon for raising concerns about a naval system, saying that reviewing the case would implicate the Pentagon's protected decision to revoke his security clearance.

  • February 16, 2024

    ADA Does Not Protect Medical Pot Use, Vt. Court Says

    A Vermont transit worker can't pursue a civil rights lawsuit against his employer who terminated him after he tested positive for marijuana, a Vermont federal judge has ruled, saying the Americans with Disabilities Act doesn't protect people with disabilities treated with medical marijuana.

  • February 16, 2024

    Swimmers Tell 9th Circ. New League Was Boycotted

    The International Swimming League and swimmers urged the Ninth Circuit on Friday to revive their certified class antitrust claims against the sport's international governing body over its alleged 2018 "boycott" of an ISL event, arguing the lower court erred in finding the organization's actions didn't constitute a boycott.

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Best Practices In Light Of NY Anti-Trans Bias Report

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    A recent report from the New York State Department of Labor indicates that bias against transgender and nonbinary people endures in the workplace, highlighting why employers must create supportive policies and gender transition plans, not only to mitigate the risk of discrimination claims, but also to foster an inclusive work culture, says Michelle Phillips at Jackson Lewis.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

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    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • Mass Arb. Rule Changes May Be A Hindrance For Consumers

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    The American Arbitration Association's recent changes to its mass arbitration supplementary rules and fee schedule, including a shift from filing fees to initiation and per-case fees, may reduce consumers' ability to counteract businesses' mandatory arbitration agreements, say Eduard Korsinsky and Alexander Krot at Levi & Korsinsky.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Series

    In Focus At The EEOC: Protecting Vulnerable Workers

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    It's meaningful that the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's strategic enforcement plan prioritizes protecting vulnerable workers, particularly as the backlash to workplace racial equity and diversity, equity and inclusion programs continues to unfold, says Dariely Rodriguez at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

  • The Latest Antitrust Areas For In-House Counsel To Watch

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    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's increasingly aggressive approach to antitrust enforcement means in-house counsel should closely monitor five key compliance issues, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • NCAA's Antitrust Litigation History Offers Clues For NIL Case

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    Attorneys at Perkins Coie analyze the NCAA's long history of antitrust litigation to predict how state attorney general claims against NCAA recruiting rules surrounding name, image and likeness discussions will stand up in Tennessee federal court.

  • SAG-AFTRA Contract Is A Landmark For AI And IP Interplay

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    SAG-AFTRA's recently ratified contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers introduced a framework to safeguard performers' intellectual property rights and set the stage for future discussions on how those rights interact with artificial intelligence — which should put entertainment businesses on alert for compliance, says Evynne Grover at QBE.

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

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    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

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