Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • February 20, 2024

    Fox Rothschild AI Chief Talks 'Terrifying' Deepfakes, Biased AI

    Mark McCreary, the chief artificial intelligence and information security officer at Fox Rothschild, leads his firm's internal AI strategy and provides counsel to other law firms trying to bushwhack their path through the often murky AI legal landscape, rife with hallucinated case law citations and disturbingly real deepfakes.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Give Feds Time In Texas, Fla. Social Media Law Fights

    The U.S. Supreme Court has set aside time for the federal government to weigh in on looming oral arguments in cases to determine the constitutionality of controversial Texas and Florida laws that restrict social media companies' ability to curb users' speech.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ransomware Group LockBit Hit By Coordinated Crackdown

    Two suspects linked to LockBit have been arrested and dozens of servers taken down as part of a global operation to disrupt the Russia-based ransomware group's activities, law enforcement agencies said Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Extraditing Assange For Political Offenses Breaches Int'l Law

    Extraditing Julian Assange to face espionage charges in the U.S. would be a fundamental breach of international laws that protect "pure political offenses," lawyers for the Wikileaks founder argued at his last-ditch appeal in London on Tuesday.

  • February 19, 2024

    Assange Poised To Make Final Bid To Halt Extradition To US

    Julian Assange will make what could be his final legal challenge on Tuesday in his long-running battle to avoid being sent to the U.S. on espionage charges arising from the publication of classified documents more than a decade ago.

  • February 16, 2024

    Bid To Ax Calif. Kids' Digital Safety Law Gets Diverse Backing

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the American Civil Liberties Union, more than a dozen media organizations and a slew of other business and consumer advocacy groups are urging the Ninth Circuit to preserve a ruling temporarily halting a new California law that requires social media platforms to bolster their privacy protections for children.

  • February 16, 2024

    Unshackled Calif. Privacy Agency To Bring Enforcement Heat

    California's privacy regulator is expected to not waste any time responding to a recent ruling that cleared the way for the fledgling agency to begin immediately enforcing the rules it's crafted under the state's data protection law, making it vital for businesses and employers to adjust their compliance efforts to meet the accelerated timeline. 

  • February 16, 2024

    Samsung Ordered To Arbitrate Hundreds Of BIPA Claims

    An Illinois federal judge has ordered Samsung Electronics to arbitrate 806 customers' biometric-privacy claims and to pay the American Arbitration Association for fees it owes in the slew of disputes, ruling that the company can't refuse to arbitrate under its own binding agreements.

  • February 16, 2024

    Startup Countersues Trucker Tracking Co. For Stealing Tech

    A venture capital-backed startup that sells dashboard cameras to monitor truck drivers is responding to a rival's well-publicized patent infringement case by filing its own patent lawsuit in a different federal court that mirrors many of the same allegations of technological theft but pointing them in the other direction.

  • February 16, 2024

    Nat'l Security Bar Kills Ex-Raytheon Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Fifth Circuit on Thursday refused to revive an engineer's claims that he was fired by defense contractor Raytheon for raising concerns about a naval system, saying that reviewing the case would implicate the Pentagon's protected decision to revoke his security clearance.

  • February 16, 2024

    PNC Bank Defeats Customer's Suit Over Fraudulent Transfer

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday tossed the two remaining claims in a suit alleging PNC Bank NA misled a California-based customer about stopping a money transfer to a scammer, saying the bank did not breach the account-holder agreement when it tried to recover the customer's funds.

  • February 16, 2024

    Malware Schemer 'Tank' Pleads Guilty To Stealing Millions

    Accused hacker group leader Vyacheslav Igorevich Penchukov, known online as "Tank," pled guilty in Nebraska federal court to charges stemming from two malware schemes Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    FTC Seeks To Crack Down On Using AI To Impersonate People

    The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday moved to broaden its recently finalized rule to combat government and business impersonation schemes to also cover scammers that use emerging artificial intelligence tools and other methods to impersonate individuals. 

  • February 15, 2024

    Home Depot, Google Sued Over AI Customer Call Monitoring

    Home Depot and Google were hit with a proposed class action in California federal court Wednesday, accusing them of deploying artificial intelligence technology to surreptitiously "eavesdrop" on calls between customers and Home Depot's representatives without permission, in violation of Golden State privacy laws.

  • February 15, 2024

    X Corp. Nears Toss Of Breach Suit Over 200M Users, For Now

    A California magistrate judge said Thursday she plans to toss a proposed class action alleging the social media giant X Corp. failed to protect the data of 200 million Twitter users whose information was exposed following a data breach, but said she'll let plaintiffs amend the complaint and try again.

  • February 15, 2024

    7th Circ. Rejects Ancestry.com's Arbitration Bid In Privacy Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday upheld a lower court's decision that minors suing Ancestry.com for sharing their genetic testing information can avoid arbitration, saying there was no language in the terms their parents signed designating the children as parties to the agreement.

  • February 15, 2024

    7th Circ. Questions $4M Samsung Arbitration Fee Order

    The Seventh Circuit seemed skeptical Thursday that more than 35,000 Samsung consumers had enough evidence to prove the telecommunications giant should pay $4 million in individual biometric privacy arbitration fees, as one judge also questioned whether the appeal is properly before the court. 

  • February 15, 2024

    House Committee Blasts VA, Oracle For E-Record Failures

    Lawmakers on Thursday rebuked the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Oracle Corp. for inadequate fixes to electronic medical records systems that they say continue to threaten the health and safety of thousands of veterans, who are not being advised of the risk.

  • February 15, 2024

    State Dept. Offers $5M For Info On 'BlackCat' Ransomware Group

    The State Department is offering millions for information on the "BlackCat" ransomware, claiming that the AlphV cybercrime group has compromised over 1,000 entities globally.

  • February 15, 2024

    Facebook Users Win Class Status For £2.3B Data Claim

    One year after sending a £2.3 billion ($2.9 billion) proposed class action against Meta Platforms Inc. back to the drawing board, the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal has agreed to certify a 44 million-strong class of U.K. consumers who say that the social media titan exploited their data.

  • February 15, 2024

    Wash. Judge Tosses Professors' Email Probe Privacy Suit

    A Washington federal judge has sided with the state in a proposed class action brought by two University of Washington professors seeking to block the state ethics board's director from combing through faculty emails during misconduct investigations, saying the emails are public records because the professors are public employees.

  • February 15, 2024

    GSA Probed For Buying Banned Chinese Conferencing Cams

    The House Oversight Committee's Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Information Technology, and Government Innovation is probing the General Services Administration's purchase of videoconference cameras made in China following a recent report by the GSA's internal watchdog the subcommittee said raised alarming questions.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOJ Says It Disrupted Russian Router Malware Network

    The U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday it had disabled a network of office internet routers that were being used by a Russian intelligence unit to engage in malware campaigns against U.S. and foreign governments as well as military officials and corporations.

  • February 15, 2024

    62 Senators Support Updated Kids Online Safety Act

    A bipartisan group of 62 senators, including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., announced on Thursday their support for an updated version of the Kids Online Safety Act.

  • February 14, 2024

    Visa Says $5B Swipe Fee Deal Blocks Intuit, Square Claims

    Visa and Mastercard have asked a New York federal court to throw out antitrust claims brought by Intuit and Square, arguing that their claims were released as part of the $5.6 billion class action settlement the credit card companies finalized with merchants last year.

Expert Analysis

  • Understanding SEC's Focus Amid Lack Of Final AI Rules

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    Although the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's proposed rules to govern artificial intelligence are likely far from being finalized, understanding existing regulatory provisions that could address AI risks with respect to development, disclosure, compliance and data protection could help firms anticipate and avoid pitfalls, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What's On The Horizon In Attorney General Enforcement

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    A look at recent attorney general actions, especially in the areas of antitrust and artificial intelligence, can help inform businesses on what they should expect in terms of enforcement trends as 10 attorney general races play out in 2024, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • $32.4M Fine For Info Disclosure Is A Stark Warning For Banks

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    The New York State Department of Financial Services and the Federal Reserve's fining of a Chinese state-owned bank $32.4 million last month underscores the need for financial institutions to have policies and procedures in place to handle confidential supervisory information, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Navigating The FCC's Rules On AI-Generated Robocall Voices

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    The Federal Communications Commission's declaratory ruling issued last week extends the agency's regulatory reach under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act to calls that use artificial intelligence technology to generate voices, laying out a compliance roadmap, but not making AI-cloned voices in robocalls illegal per se, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Despite Risks, AI Is A Worthy Tool For Healthcare Industry

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    Artificial intelligence appears to provide a productive path forward for the healthcare industry, improving economic and human health outcomes, though companies must continue to address certain technology and compliance pain points, says Sarah Abrams at Bowhead Specialty Underwriters.

  • Bitcoin ETF Approval Doesn't Mean SEC Approves Of Crypto

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    While the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's approval last month of 11 applications for spot exchange-traded funds tracking bitcoin is a landmark moment for the crypto-asset industry, investors who are hopeful that the SEC will approve similar crypto-based ETFs may be disappointed, says attorneys at Mintz.

  • Key Considerations For Evaluating An AI Vendor

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    As artificial intelligence technology advances across industries, businesses can mitigate risks, while maximizing the value of their investment, by evaluating technology, expertise, support services, transparency and more when selecting an AI vendor, say Rahul Kapoor and Shokoh Yaghoubi at Morgan Lewis.

  • SAG-AFTRA Contract Is A Landmark For AI And IP Interplay

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    SAG-AFTRA's recently ratified contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers introduced a framework to safeguard performers' intellectual property rights and set the stage for future discussions on how those rights interact with artificial intelligence — which should put entertainment businesses on alert for compliance, says Evynne Grover at QBE.

  • FTC AI Inquiry Signals Intensified Focus On Emerging Tech

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent inquiry into investments and partnerships between Big Tech companies and artificial intelligence startups appears to be directed at guiding future enforcement decisions in competition, privacy and consumer protection — and three principles discussed at a related tech summit give insight on the agency's approach, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Amazon's €32M Data Protection Fine Acts As Employer Caveat

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    The recent decision by French data privacy regulator CNIL to fine Amazon for excessive surveillance of its workers opens up a raft of potential employment law, data protection and breach of contract issues, and offers a clear warning that companies need coherent justification for monitoring employees, say Robert Smedley and William Richmond-Coggan at Freeths.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Potential Defendant Strategies Amid Calif. Privacy Questions

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    Although the current case law surrounding the California Consumer Privacy Act is in its infancy, courts have begun addressing important issues related to the notice-and-cure provisions of the statute, and these decisions show defendant-businesses would be wise to assert their notice rights early and repeatedly, say Viola Trebicka and Dan Humphrey at Quinn Emanuel.

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