Construction

  • February 20, 2024

    Pa. Contractor Says Ohio Cosmetic Centers Skipped $2M Bill

    A construction contractor took the owner of several medical spa and cosmetic surgery practices to Pennsylvania state court on Friday after the healthcare firm allegedly halted projects in two Ohio suburbs and then failed to pay $2 million that the builder was owed for its work on them.

  • February 16, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Rethink Overturning Bid-Rigging Conviction

    The Fourth Circuit declined to reconsider a panel ruling that overturned a former Contech executive's bid-rigging conviction, despite the U.S. Department of Justice's contention that the decision flouts long-standing precedent.

  • February 16, 2024

    FERC Rejects Hydro Project Permits Amid Tribal Opposition

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has denied preliminary permits for three proposed hydropower projects on Navajo Nation land in Arizona, saying a recently revised policy clarifying Indigenous rights in the agency's decision-making process and the tribe's overwhelming opposition to the applications swayed the decision.

  • February 16, 2024

    Clean Energy Cos. Must Pay Heed To PFAS Crackdown

    The clean energy industry shouldn't downplay the growing scrutiny over so-called forever chemicals, many of which are present in key components of their projects and can't be easily replaced, attorneys say.

  • February 16, 2024

    Florida Loses Wetland Permitting Authority In D.C. Court Case

    A D.C. judge has stripped Florida of its federally delegated authority to permit wetlands development, ruling that U.S. environmental regulators failed to analyze the impact of their decision on endangered and threatened species and handing a victory to conservation groups challenging the program.

  • February 16, 2024

    Feds Tell 1st Circ. Mass. Wind Farm Approval Was Sound

    The federal government has said a Massachusetts federal judge properly dumped a challenge lodged by commercial fishing groups seeking to upend federal approvals of the Vineyard Wind project, telling the First Circuit that the record shows federal agencies thoroughly studied the project's potential impacts.

  • February 16, 2024

    Condo Co., Insurer Settle Proposed Class Action Coverage

    A Miami condominium, its former management company and various insurers agreed to settle coverage for a proposed class action accusing the condominium companies of allowing the building to deteriorate, a Florida federal judge said Friday, staying the coverage litigation while the parties finalize the deal.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Quartz Biz Says Customs Charged Tariffs On Duty-Free Goods

    A quartz importer took U.S. Customs and Border Protection to court over its assessment of anti-dumping duties on dozens of quartz surface products that the U.S. Department of Commerce said should be imported duty-free.

  • February 16, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a legal battle erupt between JPMorgan and the founder of a Greek payments company following a dispute over the valuation of their jointly owned fintech business, the children of late Russian oligarch Vladimir Scherbakov face a claim by Fieldfisher LLP, the Director of Education and Training at the Solicitors Regulation Authority tackle a claim by two solicitors, and train operator First MTR South Western Trains file a claim against a security company. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • February 15, 2024

    Home Depot, Google Sued Over AI Customer Call Monitoring

    Home Depot and Google were hit with a proposed class action in California federal court Wednesday, accusing them of deploying artificial intelligence technology to surreptitiously "eavesdrop" on calls between customers and Home Depot's representatives without permission, in violation of Golden State privacy laws.

  • February 15, 2024

    NJ Court Affirms Tossing Of Corrections Worker's Bias Suit

    The New Jersey Department of Corrections provided reasonable accommodations for a secretarial assistant and continually engaged in a "responsive interactive process" regarding her disability, a state appellate court found Thursday in affirming the dismissal of her suit alleging a hostile work environment.

  • February 15, 2024

    Atty Must Be Tried Alongside Ex-Hawaii DA, Feds Say

    Prosecutors have urged a federal judge not to sever a lawyer from a criminal case against former Honolulu top prosecutor Keith Kaneshiro and others, saying she was a "primary" facilitator of a prosecution-for-donations conspiracy.

  • February 15, 2024

    New York Says Thruway Doesn't Cut Through Cayuga Land

    New York state officials are asking a federal district court to dismiss litigation by the Cayuga Nation that seeks a cut of the tolls collected on the New York State Thruway, arguing that the tribe can't prove it had possession of the land over which the highway was being built.

  • February 15, 2024

    NJ Atty Beats Greater Damages Bid Over Hotel Project Loan

    A New Jersey attorney won't have to face an additional $9.5 million in damages in a suit over a mishandled escrow agreement related to the development of a luxury New Mexico hotel, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 15, 2024

    Real Estate Rumors: Brause Realty, Microsoft, AcadeMir

    A Brause Realty venture has reportedly scored $75 million in financing for a New York mixed-use project, Microsoft is said to have paid roughly $17.7 million for nearly 300 acres in Minnesota, and AcadeMir Charter Schools has reportedly paid $16.6 million for a Florida property.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOI Inks Klamath Basin Agreement With Tribes, Water Users

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it has struck an agreement that will see water users and tribes work together in a push to improve the environment and water supplies in the drought-prone Klamath River Basin of southern Oregon and northern California, pledging $72 million for projects.

  • February 15, 2024

    Fla. Couple Get 57 Mos. For Evading $42M In Plywood Duties

    A Florida couple were sentenced to nearly five years in prison each after confessing to disguising the Chinese origin of millions of dollars' worth of plywood imports to avoid paying $42 million in import tariffs.

  • February 15, 2024

    NYC Developer Owes $87M On Defaulted Condo Loans

    A New York federal judge has ordered HFZ Capital Group to hand over $87 million after a borrower defaulted on four loans guaranteed by the beleaguered development firm, denying its claims that an earlier foreclosure sale satisfying some of the loan was commercially unreasonable.

  • February 15, 2024

    Vaughan Baio Adds 3 Partners And 2 Offices In NY, NJ

    Philadelphia-based midsized firm Vaughan Baio & Partners expanded its footprint and resources this month with the addition of three partners and the opening of two offices in New York and New Jersey.

  • February 15, 2024

    Zurich Owes $554K Over Faulty Construction Work, Erie Says

    Erie Insurance Co. told a D.C. federal court Thursday that a Zurich unit wrongly denied coverage to Erie-insured subcontractors for over $554,000 in damage stemming from faulty work at a government agency renovation project, arguing Zurich has cited the wrong coverage form to deny liability.

  • February 15, 2024

    La. Co. Fails To Prove Army Misled In $14M Canal Fix Deal

    A New Orleans contractor can't get cost adjustments on a $14.6 million deal with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to remediate canal erosion, after a dispute resolution board found no difference between the contract's description of the site and actual site conditions.

  • February 15, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Adds 2 Real Estate Experts From DLA Piper

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has brought on two seasoned DLA Piper construction law experts as its newest shareholders, adding them to the firm's Atlanta office in what Greenberg Traurig called a "strategic move to enhance its full-service, industry-leading real estate capabilities."

  • February 14, 2024

    USDA Says $20M Will Help Tribes Access Climate Market

    Federally recognized tribes and Alaska Native corporations and villages are getting a $20 million bump to broaden their access to emerging climate markets as a way to address ongoing climate change, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

Expert Analysis

  • Reducing The Risk Of PFAS False Advertising Class Actions

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    A wave of class actions continues to pummel products that allegedly contain per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, with plaintiffs challenging advertising that they say misleads consumers by implying an absence of PFAS — but there are steps companies can take to minimize risk, say attorneys at Keller and Heckman.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Assessing The Future Of Colorado's Economic Loss Rule

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    The Colorado Supreme Court's decision to review a state appellate court's ruling in Mid-Century Insurance Co. v. HIVE Construction will significantly influence the future of Colorado's economic loss rule, with high stakes for the cost of doing business in the state, says David Holman at Crisham & Holman.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Opinion

    New La. Gas Pipeline Projects Must Respect Rules And Rights

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    As pipeline developers rush to join in Louisiana's Haynesville Shale gas boom, established operators like Energy Transfer are justified in demanding that newer entrants respect safety rules, regulatory requirements and property rights when proposing routes that would cross existing pipelines, says Joshua Campbell at Campbell Law.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Preparing For A New Wave Of Litigation Under Silicosis Rules

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    After the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of California issued an emergency temporary standard to combat noncompliance with assessments of workers' exposure to particles of crystalline silica, companies that manufacture, distribute or sell silica-containing products will need aggressive case-specific discovery to navigate a new wave of litigation, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Standing And A Golden Rule

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo examines one recent decision that clarifies the elements necessary to establish prejudice and federal claims court standing in multiphase protests, and two that exemplify a government procurements golden rule.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • High Court Case Could Reshape Local Development Fees

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    If last month's oral arguments are any indication of how the U.S. Supreme Court will rule in Sheetz v. County of El Dorado, it's unlikely the justices will hold that the essential nexus and rough proportionality tests under the cases of Nollan, Dolan and Koontz apply to legislative exactions, but a sweeping decision would still be the natural progression in the line of cases giving property owners takings claims, says Phillip Babich at Reed Smith.

  • CFTC Moves May Boost Interest In Voluntary Carbon Markets

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    As companies try to reduce their net greenhouse gas emissions, many have been cautious about embracing voluntary carbon credit markets — but recent moves by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission to regulate this sector may address some of its well-known challenges, say Deborah North and Laura Daugherty at Cleary.

  • 2 SEC Orders Illuminate Bribery Risks For US-China Cos.

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s foreign bribery-related resolutions with 3M and Clear Channel offer important takeaways on compliance risks for companies with operations in China, from the role of traditionally low-risk vendors to gaps in internal accounting controls, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

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